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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 3, 2007 / 21 Tishrei 5768

Disaster plan vital

By Mark Kellner

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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The kind of loss Francis Ford Coppola suffered last week wasn't caused by a natural disaster, but in some ways it typifies what a small business could face.


As international news reports indicated, Mr. Coppola's home in the Palermo section of Buenos Aires was robbed of computers and, most important, a computer backup device containing 15 years' worth of work and family photos. The five-time Academy Award-winning director can replace the hardware; he said he wants the backup returned.


Whether it's a burglary, fire, flood or other natural disaster, the loss Mr. Coppola experienced could be yours, and it could be critical if the lost data undergirds a small business. According to one white paper on the subject, "80 percent of companies that do not recover from a disaster within one month are likely to go out of business," said Jonathan Bernstein, president of Bernstein Crisis Management, LLC, in Sierra Madre, Calif., a Los Angeles suburb.


To make matters worse, said Mark J. Dobosz, vice president for development at the Herndon, Va.-based Service Corps of Retired Executives, "Small business owners and entrepreneurs are so passionate about what they do, that their intense focus can often be a double-edged sword for them." In other words, we're too focused on our work, sometimes, to think about the worst that can happen — until it does.


The non-profit, which grew out of the U.S. Small Business Administration during the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson, specializes in offering free advice to small businesses, drawing on the resources of retired small business owners and corporate managers. These people have "been there," so to speak, and can help with disaster planning, Mr. Dobosz said, as well as give advice on what insurance might be needed.


"SCORE counselors can work with a small business owner in understanding what types of insurance are appropriate for their industry, so they make informed decisions when the entrepreneur talks to an insurance professional," he said.


There's a high-tech angle, too: Joining SCORE in this is Hewlett Packard Company, whose director of small and medium business marketing, Lisa W. Baker, told me the firm is creating workshops where small business can learn what to do to prepare for data loss in a disaster. The firm has already hosted such workshops in Houston, St. Louis, Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix, and Orange County, Calif. Plans for the Washington, D.C. area are believed to be in development.


"What I hear from these small businesses is that they know it is one of the most important issues they face, they know they need to do it, but they just aren't sure where and how to start," Ms. Baker said. "What HP and SCORE bring to the table are the tools, resources and products solutions to bring it all together and make it happen."


Mr. Dobosz added, "Data loss can literally mean the end to an otherwise successful business. One of the reasons SCORE and HP developed a collaborative workshop on using technology to protect your business data was for this very reason."


Backups — such as Mr. Coppola's — are important, but it's also vital to have things stored "off-site," or away from the office. HP offers solutions to help accomplish that, Ms. Baker said.


"HP Smart Data Protection service offers off-site client data protection," she explained. "Our 3-in-1 network-attached-storage docking station is compatible with all HP Business Notebook PCs, and it allows you to backup, share files and dock your notebook all in one device while providing an integrated 160 GB hard drive. Another option is the HP StorageWorks Media Vault Pro, which provides auto PC backup, data sharing, collaboration and offsite secure storage for your small business without any IT staff."


Of course, the time to do such planning — as the godfather of "The Godfather" movies will tell you — is before disaster strikes. Find resources at www.score.org and www.hp.com.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Mark Kellner has reported on technology for industry newspapers and magazines since 1983, and has been the computer columnist for The Washington Times since 1991.Comment by clicking here.

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