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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Oct. 7, 2005 / 4 Tishrei, 5766

A young man and his ideals

By Dick Morris


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Matt Pottinger has served as a correspondent for The Wall Street Journal in China for nearly five years. Now, at the age of 32, he is leaving to join the United States Marine Corps.

His is a story of a patriotism and commitment underscored and emphasized by the lessons he has learned living in one of the most politically repressive societies on the planet. There is so much we can all learn from him about China and about our own country.

"The regime in China," Matt contends, "is held up by two props: economic advancement and control of news and information. The government is very good at both."

How can a modern government police how 1.3 billion people who use the vast resources of the Internet? Pottinger explains: "The authorities spend countless man hours, involving tens of thousands of officials, monitoring what the Chinese people are accessing online." And, he adds, Western companies facilitate their task by selling the sophisticated equipment and software that Beijing uses to maintain the new wall of China — its Internet firewall.

Pottinger says that living up close and personal under an authoritarian government made him value freedom all the more. He remembers once interviewing Chinese workers who were protesting official corruption only to be approached by a government thug — at a Starbucks in Beijing, no less — who punched him and said: "You will get f- - -ing out of the country. Right now." Matt, however, defied the warning and remained in China and continued trying to report the truth despite official intimidation.

What of the other prop that holds up the Chinese regime — the spectacular economic growth? "The Chinese are infinitely adaptable," he says. "They have a strong sense of national purpose and are dedicated to making their country succeed. They will adopt whatever skills they need to compete in the global economy and win; they are highly, highly motivated."

But, Pottinger says, "China's economic boom is based disproportionately on manufacturing and speculative real-estate deals." He adds that "even the healthiest economies experiences recession from time to time. If China goes into recession, the ruling Communist Party will try to deflect popular attention away from its problems by blaming the United States and Japan."

But now Pottinger has decided to stand at the frontier of freedom with the Marines. Will his fluency in Chinese be of much use in the military? Who knows? "The Marines need Arabic speakers more than Chinese speakers at the moment," he notes, "so maybe I'll learn Arabic."

For now he is on his way to boot camp at Quantico to try to become an officer. If he makes it, he'll be commissioned as a second lieutenant. Why would he sacrifice a good salary with a prestigious publication for pushups and 20-mile forced marches?

For all of its shortcomings, this war in Iraq and Afghanistan is not being fought by the children of the poor at the behest of the rich. It is no Vietnam in that sense or in many others.

Matt's father, Stan Pottinger, served as assistant attorney general under Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. Credited with inventing the concept of affirmative action (as an alternative to racial quotas), he recently renewed his reputation by keeping the secret of who was Deep Throat for 30 years, according to Bob Woodward, after finding out his identity in an unrelated federal prosecution.

While Matt Pottinger is following his father's example of public service, the story of a young man interrupting his climb up the ladder of his career to serve us all by putting his life at risk for no financial reward is inspiring and worth sharing in this column.

We all could use a dose of his idealism from time to time. We could all use the courage to start again at the beginning and pursue our dreams, as Matt Pottinger is doing.

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JWR contributor Dick Morris is author, most recently, of "Because He Could". (Click HERE to purchase. Sales help fund JWR.) Comment by clicking here.



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