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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Sept. 5, 2011 / 6 Elul, 5771

Space nations must clean up after themselves

By Dale McFeatters




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Mankind's next big space mission may be its least glamorous: cleaning up the tens of thousands, maybe even millions, of pieces of debris left behind in 54 years of space exploration.

The space junk ranges from large, discarded upper-stage rockets and defunct satellites to tiny metal fragments, many of them a millimeter or smaller. Even the little pieces are a threat to astronauts, the space station, the rockets supporting them and working satellites because they orbit at lethal, super-high speeds.

The National Research Council says that the amount of space debris is past the "tipping point." Space launches will become riskier and more expensive because of the problems of avoiding debris and armoring space vehicles against the impact of unavoidable junk.

The cleanup calls for a coordinated international effort by the dozen or so space-faring nations. The U.S.'s NASA should take the lead because it has the skill to track debris -- the military space command is currently tracking 22,000 pieces 4 inches or larger -- and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has the inventive minds to devise ways of eliminating it. Besides, 30 percent of the junk is ours.

But China especially should be assessed a large share of cleanup duties and costs. In 2007, despite warnings from other space nations, China, in a reckless and pointless display of its new space prowess, launched a missile to hit an obsolete weather satellite. The impact created 150,000 new pieces of space debris, 3,118 large enough to be tracked from the ground.

That, combined with the collision of two satellites over Siberia in 2009, more than doubled the amount of junk in orbit.

Left alone, the problem will only get worse as random pieces of space junk collide, creating even more debris.

Unfortunately, the space shuttles, with their long arms and capacious cargo bays, are now out of service. Other possible solutions -- huge nets and giant umbrellas to trap the junk, debris-gobbling satellites, electromagnetic harpoons -- are still doodles on the drawing board.

The NRC recommends consolidation and permanent funding of NASA's debris-management programs and close coordination with the State Department to involve the other major space nations.

It would be a cruel twist of fate if, in our eagerness to explore space, we made it nearly impossible to do through our own careless littering.

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Previously:

09/02/11 Osama bin Laden died a failure and he knew it

09/01/11 Time to retire political pie in the face

08/31/11 Labor Day celebrates what, exactly?

08/30/11 These arrestees really are framed

08/25/11 When in an earthquake, block traffic

08/23/11 A case for discretion in deportation arrests

08/22/11 Tough times or not, parents shell out for school

08/18/11 Being unpleasant for fun, profit, promotion

08/17/11 Time to prepare for the end game in Libya

08/16/11: ‘Super Committee’ starts facing reality

08/15/11: World's fastest plane disappears even faster

08/12/11: British cops track rioters through security cameras

08/11/11: Relax. There is no Death Star

08/10/11: House pages run final errands

08/09/11: U.S. treading water on job creation

08/08/11: Uncle Sam, the world's permanent guest

08/05/11: Most 9/11 victims not on federal death records

08/04/11: Russian PM calls U.S. a ‘parasite.’ He should be so lucky

08/03/11: Congress goes from one bind to another

08/02/11: D.B. Cooper may no longer be a mystery

08/01/11: Libya's latest weapon against NATO --- lawsuits

07/29/11: He'll always be known as Hot Wheels Handler

07/25/11: Recruiting children to save a dying town

07/22/11: Bachmann's admirable medical candor

07/12/11: Social Security's grave mistakes

07/08/11: Debt crisis need not be constitutional crisis

07/07/11: Startups entice new talent with kickball, treehouses

07/05/11: Stranded tourists get rare treat

06/30/11: The dollar Americans refuse to spend

06/27/11: The hangman doesn't cometh





© 2011, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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