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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

5 facts about quinoa nutrition and cooking this whole grain

By Jessie Price


Quinoa cookies with chocolate chips make a tasty gluten-free treat




JewishWorldReview.com | By now you've probably tasted quinoa, and probably even know how to pronounce it ("keen-wah"). Maybe you've come to love it because it's a healthy whole grain and cooks up in just 20 minutes or because it has a lovely nutty taste and delicate popping texture. But are you quinoa-savvy?

Here are facts about quinoa nutrition, rinsing and cooking quinoa, and how to use quinoa flour and quinoa flakes:

QUINOA VARIETIES: WHAT IS RED QUINOA? WHAT IS BLACK QUINOA?
Quinoa is a quick-cooking, gluten-free whole grain (actually a pseudo whole-grain, because it's cooked like a whole grain but is the seed of a beet relative). Quinoa grows in a rainbow of colors, but the most commonly available are red, black and white. Taste and nutrition are similar among the colors. White quinoa tends to cook up fluffier, while red quinoa and black quinoa have a crunchier texture and the grains don't stick together as much.

QUINOA NUTRITION FACTS
Quinoa is nutritionally renowned for its protein content and while it does have a decent amount, it's not actually the amount of protein that's so impressive. Instead it's the type of protein. Quinoa has the perfect balance of all nine amino acids essential for human nutrition. This type of complete protein is rarely found in plant foods, though common in meats. Quinoa also offers a good dose of fiber and iron. There are 111 calories in each 1/2 cup of cooked quinoa.


HOW TO RINSE QUINOA
Do you need to rinse quinoa or not? Conventional wisdom has it that you need to rinse quinoa before cooking. Why? Quinoa seeds are coated with saponin, a bitter substance that protects the seeds from predators. However, most quinoa sold in the U.S. is pre-rinsed so there's no need to do this. If you want to be cautious, go ahead and give it a rinse: Put the quinoa in a bowl, cover it with water, swish it around and then drain it in a fine-mesh sieve.

HOW TO COOK QUINOA: QUINOA-TO-WATER RATIO
If you can cook rice, you can cook quinoa. Here's the simplest way to cook quinoa: Combine 1 cup quinoa with 2 cups water (or broth) in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer until tender and most of the liquid has been absorbed, 15 to 20 minutes. Fluff with a fork before serving. When it's cooked, quinoa will look slightly translucent and the white "string," which is actually part of the hull, will be visible.


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One cup dry quinoa yields 3 cups cooked or 6 (1/2-cup) servings. Keep in mind how fluffy quinoa gets when you're putting it into soups. Don't add too much or you'll find all your liquid has disappeared.

HOW TO BAKE WITH QUINOA FLOUR AND HOW TO COOK WITH QUINOA FLAKES
Want to go beyond basic quinoa? Here's what to look for next: quinoa flakes, which are a lot like rolled oats and can be used similarly, and quinoa flour, a great option for baking, especially gluten-free baking. Look for both products in well-stocked supermarkets or natural-foods stores.

Wondering how to make your own quinoa flour? To make quinoa flour, grind white quinoa in a clean coffee grinder until it's a fine powder. It won't be quite as fine as what you get in the store, but will work in recipes for cookies and bars where a really fine texture is not necessary.

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