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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Be fruitful and . . . your kids will have healthier marriages

By Melissa Healy


Balloon Man and Hasidic Family By irwin502002/Flickr


Study: The more siblings, the better for matrimony


JewishWorldReview.com | (MCT) People who grow up with lots of siblings are more likely to marry — and to stay married — than are only children or those who grew up with one or two siblings, a new study has found.


Those of us who grew up in big families may get more practice suppressing the urge to strangle a bullying older brother in his sleep, or to stick an annoying little sister's head in the toilet — a useful exercise for sustaining a marital relationship. We may be more skilled in creating alliances with siblings when adversity outside or elsewhere in the family mounts. And the experience of never having the house to oneself may foster a distaste for being alone.


Whatever the explanation, when it comes to preventing divorce in adulthood, "the more siblings the better," concluded a group of sociologists from Ohio State University, who presented their research Tuesday at the American Sociological Association.


In a sample of 57,000 American adults surveyed at 28 points between 1972 and 2012, the researchers found that just 4 percent had grown up without any siblings.


Of the 80 percent who had married at some point during the period studied, 36 percent had been through a divorce.


Among those who had married, each additional sibling a person had was associated with a 2 percent decline in his or her odds of having divorced. Only-children were not only less likely to marry than those with siblings; they were more likely to have divorced.



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The study's findings provide "one of the few pieces of evidence that siblings provide value," acknowledged the researchers, Donna Bobbitt-Zeher, Douglas B. Downey and Joseph Merry. Research on the impact of siblings has largely found that only-children and those in smaller families fare better economically and in school. But with plummeting family sizes and an explosion of single-child families in industrialized democracies, researchers have begun focusing on the less tangible benefits of sharing a household with brothers and sisters.


Studies in the past decade have found substantial psychological differences between only-children and those with any siblings. But the Ohio State team found a subtler, more unexpected pattern in which "more is better." In a subsequent analysis of their findings, the group noted that at around seven siblings, the divorce-prevention benefits of having additional siblings leveled off.


While the trend toward smaller families is well established in the United States, it is even stronger in several European countries, where families with a single child have become quite common. If supported by further research, the finding that such children may be less likely to marry and, if they do, more likely to divorce could result in significant demographic shifts, here and elsewhere, say the researchers.

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© 2013, Los Angeles Times Distributed by MCT Information Services



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