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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review August 5, 2013/ 29 Menachem-Av, 5773

Eisenhower sounded a lot like Rand Paul

By Jack Kelly




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | One reason why Democrats are in power and Republicans aren't is the zest with which Republicans attack each other, rather than Democrats.

We've seen this for months in the internecine "debate" over immigration reform, which has consisted more of name calling than an exchange of ideas or an airing of concerns. Each faction has been demanding the excommunication of the other.

Now we see a nasty split forming over national security policy. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a potential presidential candidate in 2016, took a shot a "libertarian foreign policy" over the weekend, and at its principal advocate, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky, another potential 2016 GOP presidential candidate.

"This strain of libertarianism that's going through both parties right now and making big headlines I think is a very dangerous thought," Gov. Christie said at the Aspen (Colo.) Security Forum. "The next attack that comes, that kills thousands of people as a result, people are going to be looking back on the people who are having this intellectual debate and wondering whether they put.." (he left the sentence unfinished).

Gov. Christie didn't bring up Sen. Paul in his initial remarks. When asked if he was criticizing Sen. Paul, the governor said: "You can name any number of people and he's one of them."

Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., compared GOP libertarians to "the anti-war, left-wing Democrats of the 1960s that nominated George McGovern," on CNN's "State of the Union" program Sunday.

It was "madness" for Mr. Paul to have hailed as a whistleblower Edward Snowden, the former contractor for the National Security Agency who revealed the existence of the NSA's massive data collection programs on American citizens to a British newspaper, Mr. King said.

What prompted the attacks on libertarians in the Republican Party generally and Sen. Paul specifically was the narrow rejection in the House last week of an amendment by Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich, to remove the legal authority for one of those programs.

The Amash amendment would have amended the Patriot Act to prevent the NSA from collecting telephone metadata (phone numbers called and length of each call) on U.S. citizens

It failed, 205-217. Republicans opposed it, 94-134. Despite strong opposition from the White House, Democrats supported it, 111-83.


"It was "absolutely disgraceful that so many Republicans voted to defund the NSA program which has done so much to protect our country," Mr. King said. "This is an isolationist streak that's in our party that goes totally against the party of Eisenhower and Reagan and Bush."

By making so sweeping an attack on libertarians, Mr. Christie "has picked a fight without a strategy," said Ramesh Ponnuru, a conservative who has written admiringly of the New Jersey governor.

Libertarians are an important part of the Republican coalition, and many Republicans who aren't down-the-line libertarians share some of their concerns, Mr. Ponnuru said.

"These Republicans can be persuaded to overcome their libertarian instincts on many issues -- but not by being told that they shouldn't have these instincts in the first place," he said.

In his criticism of Gov. Christie's criticism, Mr. Ponnuru maligns libertarians, too. Rep. Amash, 33, has been described as "the next Ron Paul," which would be troublesome if it were true.

The former Texas congressman was unwilling to support U.S. military interventions abroad for any reason, or to vote money for national defense.

But in an interview with Reason magazine in March, Mr. Amash rejected "isolationism," said he supported the U.S. military interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq, and favored stronger sanctions against Iran.

Ron Paul is Rand's father, which makes some suspect his foreign policy views may be as extreme as Dad's. But evidence so far is lacking.

"I don't mind spying on terrorists," Sen. Paul said in response to Mr. Christie. "I just don't like spying on all Americans."

That's perfectly reasonable, and it's a view shared by most Americans. And Peter King take note: in his farewell address, Eisenhower sounded a lot like Rand Paul:

"In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes."

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JWR contributor Jack Kelly, a former Marine and Green Beret, was a deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force in the Reagan administration.

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© 2013, Jack Kelly

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