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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Faith communities come up with alternative to health insurance

By Veronica Chufo


Health insurance from Bigstock




System is already working, ObamaCare be damned


JewishWorldReview.com |

N EWPORT NEWS, Va. — (MCT) Amanda Rooker doesn't pay for health insurance. Instead, she pays a monthly share to cover other people's health bills.

It's part of a medical bill sharing program called Medi-Share, which claims an exemption from federal health reform's individual mandate. Under the exemption, members of healthcare sharing ministries — organizations where members share financial resources to pay one another's medical costs — are not required to carry insurance by 2014 or face penalties, according to Medi-Share.

Medi-Share is one of three similar, large Christian-based bill-sharing programs available in the U.S. Medi-Share covers about 13,000 households. Combined, the three groups have about 100,000 individual participants, said Robert Baldwin, president of Florida-based Christian Care Ministry, which oversees Medi-Share.

"It's a highly organized way of passing the hat," he said.

Rooker, of York County, Va., enrolled in Medi-Share after the birth of her second son. Her husband had changed jobs, and the new insurance plan was expensive for a "woman of childbearing age," she said.

So Rooker, who's self-employed, signed up her husband and two sons on her husband's employer-sponsored health plan, and shopped around for health insurance for herself. That's when she found Medi-Share.

"At first, it was just a cost-effective option to health insurance," she said.

She pays $133 a month to Medi-Share and $250 per incident per year for her medical bills. Anything over that, she can submit to the group to pay.

"That has really encouraged me to look into self care and natural remedies," Rooker said. She sees a naturopath, a provider who emphasizes natural remedies, which would not be covered by insurance anyway, she said.

The only bill she has submitted to Medi-Share was for a hormonal imbalance, and they covered it, Rooker said.


Members can qualify for discounts if they're healthy. If they're not, they're assigned a health coach. That helps keep monthly shares down, Baldwin said.

Rooker sees it as a kind of catastrophic insurance. If something terrible were to happen, she would have help covering the bills, she said.

"It's less than what I would pay for health insurance," she said. "It's just a more customized personalized health program that works for me."

Medi-Share members are encouraged to seek treatment among the more than 600,000 physicians and tens of thousands of hospitals that are a part of the network to take advantage of prenegotiated discounts, Baldwin said.

All the local hospitals are on the network, Rooker said, so she hasn't worried about out-of-network expenses.

Members must sign a statement of faith professing faith in Christ and agree not to engage in sex outside of traditional Christian marriage, use tobacco or illegal drugs or abuse legal drugs or alcohol.


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Members are not permitted to submit bills for a list of things, including abortion of a live fetus, birth control procedures and/or supplies and breast implants or reductions.

For that reason, she understands it's not for everybody.

"I don't think it would work well for people who have babies or small children who want to have their immunizations and well checks," she added.

"I would really like to see more affinity-based cost-sharing groups pop up, which are not just evangelical Christian, but anyone else who has a common health belief, so that it's smaller and people can feel more connected to each other," Rooker said. "I think the model is innovative, and I would really like to see it replicated."

When people have a common understanding about health and beliefs, they can agree on what's covered, she said.

"You can trust that other members will provide for your need when you need it because there's a common bond there," she said. .

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