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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review August 1, 2011 / 1 Menachem-Av, 5771

Dude, where's my MANPAD?… Training scenarios … More

By Lisa Hoffman




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | WASHINGTON --- The State Department congratulated itself and the rest of the U.S. government this past week for ridding the world of more than 32,500 shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missiles since 2003.

That sounds impressive until you consider that there are an estimated 500,000 of these weapons still out there, including in Libya, the Middle East, Afghanistan, Iraq, the Balkans and virtually every other land that is home to insurgents, guerrillas, terrorists or other evildoers.

The weapons -- which also are known as Man-Portable Air Defense Systems, or MANPADS -- are beloved for their portability, ease of concealment, low cost and, most important, their lethality, particularly against helicopters and other aircraft. They reportedly also are easy to procure from Eastern Europe and China.

The State report, released this past week, says U.S. agencies found and disposed of MANPADS in 30 countries in the past eight years. It also says the missiles have been used in attacks against 40 civilian aircraft since the mid-1970s.

What it does not specifically address are recent reports from The New York Times and other sources that about 20,000 MANPADS cannot be accounted for in Libya alone. Apparently, rebel forces have looted thousands from government depots and their whereabouts are unknown.

Public-health experts agree that food safety is a matter of major concern. Recent reports of E. coli contamination deaths, and recalls of beef, tomatoes, peanuts, etc., for possible Listeria or Salmonella bugs, as well as fears of poisoning by terrorists, raise the specter of mass sickness and worse.

But you wouldn't know that by the lighthearted tone of the titles of training scenarios offered by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to police, medical personnel, first responders and the private sector.

For instance, "How Sweet It Is(n't)" is the title for training on tracing back contaminated food to its source, as well as handling a recall of tainted food. "Wilted Woes" focuses on early detection of illnesses that become a "human health emergency" and how to identify the food responsible.

"High Plains Harbinger" teaches how to investigate the intentional infection of cattle with foot-and-mouth disease. And "Insider Addition" demonstrates dealing with the intentional chemical contamination of a raw-meat product at a processor.

The pack of conservative Blue Dog Democrats in Congress will lose another member next year, which means the once-influential bloc is poised to shrink to far less than half the size it once was.

Before last November's election, there were 54 self-proclaimed House Blue Dogs, fiscal conservatives who in the past were regularly wooed by both parties as potential swing votes.

Now, there are just 25, and five of them will not run again in the 2012 races. The latest to retire is Rep. Mike Ross of Arkansas, who said this past week he's bowing out to spend more time with his family -- and, politics watchers predict, run for governor.

Redistricting by GOP-led statehouses could further shrink their ranks.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

Comment by clicking here.

Washington Calling pokes behind the scenes, sizes up events and looks ahead of the news. This capital feature, started in 1941, is written is the original inside-Washington column.


Previously:


07/25/11: Navy officers beached . . . Savings bonds . . . Cleaning house
07/18/11: National Mall sprawl?. . . Coming clean with FTC
07/05/11: Congressional pensions; D.C. online gambling; FEMA errors
06/27/11: ‘Most-wanted’ list has openings … DHS campaign



© 2011, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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