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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review August 22, 2011 / 22 Menachem-Av, 5771

Tough times or not, parents shell out for school

By Dale McFeatters




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Americans may be worrying about layoffs and a second recession, but it's made them only moderately less openhanded in back-to-school spending, which has quietly assumed the status of a major economic barometer and event.

Retailers say parents are more inclined to shop sales, make do with last year's clothes and supplies; over 40 percent say they'll spend less than last year. At least, that's what they're telling pollsters.

It's not your imagination: The back-to-school sales really are starting earlier each summer. Retailers say it's because consumers are demanding. The more cynical think the stores want to grab back-to-school shoppers before they're tapped out.

Here's another reason for early shopping, at least this year. The Associated Press reports: "Retailers are raising prices on merchandise an average of 10 percent across-the-board this fall in an effort to offset their rising costs for materials and labor."

When it's all over, the National Retail Federation estimates that the combined spending on kindergarten through high school and college will total $68.8 billion, well above pre-recession levels. The NRF says that makes it "the second-biggest consumer-spending event for retailers behind the winter holidays."

Families with children K through 12 will spend an average of $603.63 to equip their little scholars with school supplies, clothes, shoes and the like, only a few bucks below last year's average of $606.40.

There is a significant decline in one category that has been among back-to-school's fastest-growing -- electronics. The federation says college students and their families will spend an average of $236.94 on computers, cellphones, MP3 players and other devices. That's down from last year's $266.08, a record high.

The federation has an interesting explanation for this: "This year's sixth-graders were born in 2000; there's no piece of technology today's students don't know about, haven't used or don't already own." And they no longer regard technology purchases as seasonal -- say, right before the start of school. They buy these devices as new ones are introduced and they can afford them.

Bad economic times or not, American parents are still willing to spend on their children's education, even if they have to strain the family budget. The kids can reciprocate by studying hard in school this year.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

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Previously:

08/18/11 Being unpleasant for fun, profit, promotion

08/17/11 Time to prepare for the end game in Libya

08/16/11: ‘Super Committee’ starts facing reality

08/15/11: World's fastest plane disappears even faster

08/12/11: British cops track rioters through security cameras

08/11/11: Relax. There is no Death Star

08/10/11: House pages run final errands

08/09/11: U.S. treading water on job creation

08/08/11: Uncle Sam, the world's permanent guest

08/05/11: Most 9/11 victims not on federal death records

08/04/11: Russian PM calls U.S. a ‘parasite.’ He should be so lucky

08/03/11: Congress goes from one bind to another

08/02/11: D.B. Cooper may no longer be a mystery

08/01/11: Libya's latest weapon against NATO --- lawsuits

07/29/11: He'll always be known as Hot Wheels Handler

07/25/11: Recruiting children to save a dying town

07/22/11: Bachmann's admirable medical candor

07/12/11: Social Security's grave mistakes

07/08/11: Debt crisis need not be constitutional crisis

07/07/11: Startups entice new talent with kickball, treehouses

07/05/11: Stranded tourists get rare treat

06/30/11: The dollar Americans refuse to spend

06/27/11: The hangman doesn't cometh





© 2011, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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