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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review August 11, 2009 / 21 Menachem-Av 5769

Is crowding criminogenic?

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The first thing you have to know when you read that California's 33 adult prisons — like the state prison in Chino where riots erupted over the weekend — are operating at 190 percent capacity is that 100 percent capacity means one inmate per cell, single bunks in dormitories and no beds in spaces not designed for housing. Put two inmates in a single cell and bunk beds in lieu of single beds and you get 200 percent capacity.


The very notion of "capacity" has been somewhat misleading. As Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation spokesman Seth Unger noted, "There has always been an understanding that you could put two inmates in a cell and have them safely housed."


Yet that understanding is lacking on the federal bench. Last week three federal judges — Stephen Reinhardt, Lawrence Karlton and Thelton Henderson — ordered the state to release more than 40,000 of the 150,000 prisoners in 33 prisons over the next two years. Their rationale: "Overcrowding" impairs prisoners' right to "constitutionally adequate medical and mental health care."


No worries, the judges explained in their 184-page opinion. Releasing one in four prisoners can be done "without a meaningful adverse impact on public safety." The judges seem to think that if they repeat that mantra, they can make it so.


The ruling — which frequently cites two decisions written by (who else?) two of the three judges — barely mentions a judge-appointed federal receiver for the prison health care system, Clark Kelso, under whose tenure health care spending per inmate rose to $13,778 per inmate in 2007-2008 — an 81 percent increase over two years. Inmate deaths dropped from 270 per 100,000 in 2006 to 218 per 100,000 in 2008. It is the failure to note positive developments in prison health care that makes the judges' decision suspect.


By their own reckoning, the judges estimated the number of "bad beds" — triple bunks, two inmates in a cell and beds in rooms not meant to house prisoners — at 14,000 at the time of the trial. But they want to release three times as many prisoners because they believe that "crowding" is "criminogenic" — or likely to produce criminals. That's the agenda driving the opinion.


Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's office is likely to appeal the decision on the grounds that a panel of three unelected federal judges does not have the right to run state prisons.


Even still, there must be people in his office who are gleeful about this gift from the federal bench. The latest budget agreement calls for $1.2 billion in cuts in the corrections budget — with reductions in the prison population by a like amount.


Or as Unger explained, there is little gain in sending the 70,000 parolees with "technical parole violations" to prison and conducting a new battery of diagnostic tests — to only release them three or four months later. And: "It's not releasing 40,000 inmates as much as it is targeting who comes into state prison in the first place."


But Schwarzenegger tried this in 2004 — and the result, as the Sacramento Bee reported, was 2,529 fewer inmates in prison on parole violations, but 2,141 more parolees incarcerated for new crimes. Sounds criminogenic to me.

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© 2009, Creators Syndicate

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