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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review August 16, 2007 / 2 Elul, 5767

The man behind the haircut

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders
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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Elizabeth Edwards complained to the Progressive magazine that antiwar critics such as Sen. Barack Obama are "behaving in a holier-than-thou" manner on Iraq. Too bad for Edwards that Obama opposed the war in Iraq in 2002, while her husband John Edwards — as well as Sens. Joe Biden, Hillary Clinton and Christopher Dodd — voted for the Iraq war resolution.


Holier-than-thou antiwar Democrats. Isn't that phrase redundant? Elizabeth Edwards now is more than John Edwards' wife. She has become his Spiro Agnew. Remember Agnew, President Richard M. Nixon's first vice president and designated verbal hatchet man, known famously for dismissing critics as "nattering nabobs of negativism"?


Mrs. E isn't quite as lyrical as Agnew. Recently, she told Salon.com that Hillary Clinton seemed to feel the need "to behave as a man and not talk about women's issues." Not much alliteration in that slam.


Worse, last month, Elizabeth Edwards complained: "We can't make John black, we can't make him a woman. Those things get you a lot of press, worth a certain amount of fund-raising dollars."


That's right: All Edwards has is a wife with cancer. And as fiercely as the couple tries to play that victim card, Edwards remains in third place. His RealClearPolitics poll average of 12 percent lags far behind Clinton's 40 percent and Obama's 21 percent.


Elizabeth Edwards also accused Obama of "lifting her husband's best lines" from 2004, "which is maybe not surprising since one of his speechwriters was one of our speechwriters, his media guy was our media guy." She complained that Obama is using John Edwards' rhetoric — turning "hope is on the way" to "the audacity of hope" — which I guess is wrong because Edwards apparently now owns the word "hope."


Every time an Edwards opens his or her trap, you can feel the desperation. And no matter how nasty they get, it can't help, because John Edwards' biggest problem is that he comes across as the biggest phony in the race.


He's the swell who charged UC Davis $55,000 — for a 2006 speech on poverty; the self-styled populist who not only treated himself to two $400 haircuts, but also passed the tab along to his campaign; the global warming scold who built a 28,000-square-foot mansion.


Edwards is so full of himself that he doesn't do his homework. He demanded that fellow Democrats forswear contributions from Rupert Murdoch, the man behind Fox News — oblivious to the fact that Murdoch's HarperCollins had paid him a $500,000 advance, and $300,000 in expenses, for Edward's 2006 book, "Home: The Blueprints of Our Lives."


Elizabeth Edwards disingenuously told the Progressive that when her husband voted for the war resolution, "Mostly the antiwar cry was from people who weren't hearing what he was hearing. And the resolution wasn't really to go to war. The resolution, if you recall, was forcing (President) Bush to go to the U.N. first."


That's simply not true. The resolution title was clear: "to authorize the use of United States Armed Forces against Iraq." There was no language requiring Bush to win U.N. approval.


And how does Edwards deal with a vote he now calls a mistake? At a February Democratic forum, John Edwards crowed, "I think I was the first, at least close to being the first, to say very publicly that I was wrong."


Elizabeth Edwards is trashing the front-running Democrats because her husband is trailing in the presidential primary — and rather than take each of them on directly, he is hiding behind his wife's skirt.

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© 2007, Creators Syndicate

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