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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review August 4, 2004 / 17 Menachem-Av, 5764

Non-intrusive=bad friend?; best friend's daughter is not for my son; bris-less grandsons

Wendy Belzberg
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http://www.jewishworldreview.com | Q: I had dinner with a close friend last week. I know through a mutual friend that he is having marital problems. I wondered whether to broach the subject but decided not to ask specifically about his personal situation. My thought was that if he wanted to talk about it, he would bring it up; and I didn't want to be intrusive. He didn't bring it up. When I got home my wife berated me for being a lousy friend.


A: Rather than berate you for being a lousy friend, your wife could have commended you for your unerring masculinity. What is it about an intimate or personal conversation that makes most men squirm? What is the worst thing that could happen if you had broached the subject of your friend's marriage? Maybe he would have said that he didn't want to talk about. No harm done. Or he might have unburdened himself of a weight he has been hauling around for months —particularly if all his "close friends" subscribe to the same philosophy as you. Sorry to say that I weigh in with your wife on this one. But you can regain the upper hand. Why don't you make another dinner date?

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Q: My son is engaged to be married to one of my dear friends' daughters. I love the friend but I have an aversion to the daughter. Do I say as much?


A: Say as much to whom: your friend or your son? Either call would be a lose-lose. Look at the bright side —you like your in-laws. Life could be so much worse: You could hate your daughter-in-law-to-be and her parents as well. At least you can't worry about not enjoying the wedding.

Q: My daughter Katherine is five or six months pregnant with my second grandson. She declined to have the first (currently four years old) circumcised, and doubtless intends to repeat this Halachic felony with the second. Given that one or the other boy might be interested in affirming his Jewishness at some point, this seems like a myopic decision.


A: Most parents want to see that their children make the most of every opportunity in life. What parent doesn't fantasize that her son may be a concert cellist, an Olympic skier, a recipient of the Nobel Peace prize? To slam a door on a child even before he is 2 weeks old is antithetical being a parent. Particularly a Jewish parent. But that is exactly what your daughter is doing. To count himself among the Jewish people, a male must be circumcised. Your daughter has made it impossible for her sons to be recognized as Jews, leaving them only one option: a very painful one much later in life. You might want to remind your daughter there is a necessary connection between being Jewish and being circumcised. Don't let your daughter off easy; I urge you to intervene on behalf of your grandsons.

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© 2004, Wendy Belzberg