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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 16, 2013/ 9 Menachem-Av, 5773

Rooting Out Government Leakers

By Tom Purcell




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The name is Monday. Agent Monday. I have an important job to do.

Back in 2011 President Obama issued an executive order to root out security violators within the federal government — people like Edward Snowden, our most recent leaker of government secrets.

The president ordered federal employees to report suspicious activities among their co-workers — any unusual behaviors, strange attitudes, financial troubles or unprecedented travel common to people who sell or leak secrets, the lousy rats.

I am the lead agent in charge of investigating such people. My phone has been ringing off the hook.

My first call took me to the Department of Health and Human Services. The people there have been interpreting Obama's massive 2,700 page health care law to write new regulations. It has ballooned to 20,000 pages of mandates and penalties that weigh 300 pounds and stand 7 feet tall.

"One of our employees read through every page and he's been acting odd ever since," a bureaucrat told me. "He worried that the new rules will bankrupt the country."

"He leak this information to anyone?"

"No," said the bureaucrat. "When he tried to sneak the stack of regulations out the door, it fell on him, causing his unfortunate demise."

"Serves him right," I said, smiling.

Just as I settled the ObamaCare case, my phone rang. An employee was acting out of line at the IRS.

"She has been coming in early and staying late," said the IRS bureaucrat. "We've never seen anything like it."


"Has she been targeting, harassing and auditing conservatives?" I said.

"No."

"Does she spend money lavishly on expensive conferences and silly training videos?"

"No," said the bureaucrat. "That's the problem. She refuses to do so. What a killjoy."

"Sounds like someone who is planning to sing."

"Unless someone makes it look like she was embezzling funds and her reputation is ruined?"

"I like how you think," I said.

Just then my phone rang again. We had a potential rat at the Environmental Protection Agency.

"We've tried to keep it quiet," said the EPA bureaucrat, "but we're using every means possible to re-interpret existing laws to create new regulations."

"Let me get this right," I said. "Since the president can't pass the restrictive environmental laws he wants, his EPA is just making up new rules?"

"That's right," said the bureaucrat. "We issued a slew of new regulations to curb U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, which we believe contribute to global warming. Coal plants are shutting down left and right."

"So what's the problem?"

"We have an employee who is criticizing our lack of openness," said the bureaucrat. "He says in a constitutional republic, new laws cannot be arbitrarily created in the executive branch — which is essentially what we are doing. He says we are being unconstitutional."

"Good God," I said. "You have been infiltrated by a conservative. He'll surely contact the press and sing."

"We expect not," said the bureaucrat. "Since he was a conservative, it wasn't too hard for a government psychiatrist to diagnose him as mentally unfit. We put him on forced disability."

"Nicely played," I said.

Some argue that government leakers are not the real problem our country is facing. The real problem is that our government has gotten too big, powerful and intrusive.

They argue that the recent scandals are not isolated incidents — that the scandals are what big government looks like.

Maybe so, but that is not my concern.

My only concern is this: I am Agent Monday and I have an important job to do.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR Contributor Tom Purcell, author of 'Misadventures of a 1970's Childhood,' is a nationally syndicated columnist. Comment by clicking here. To visit his web site, click here.


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© 2013, Tom Purcell

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