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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 30, 2013/ 23 Menachem-Av, 5773

Mitch Daniels, sinner

By Rich Lowry




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Former Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels, now the president of Purdue University, has impeccable taste in historians.

Upon the death of Howard Zinn in 2010, he wrote an email to his advisers about Zinn's most famous work, "A People's History of the United States." "It is a truly execrable, anti-factual piece of disinformation that misstates American history on every page," he said. "Can someone assure me that it is not in use anywhere in Indiana? If it is, how do we get rid of it before any more young people are force-fed a totally false version of our history?"

He was appalled to find out that Indiana University used the tome in a course training the state's teachers, and wanted his education adviser to look into such courses and impose some standards. "Disqualify the propaganda," he urged, "and highlight (if there is any) the more useful offerings."

Just revealed, the emails have occasioned much heavy breathing among the sorts of people for whom lacking perspective is a professional obligation. For them, Daniels might as well be a book-burning fireman out of Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451."

Ninety-two Purdue professors signed a letter warning that "the very viability of academic inquiry and the university's mission is at stake." The American Historical Association said it "deplores the spirit and intent" of the emails, and considers "any governor's action that interfered with an individual teacher's reading assignments to be inappropriate and a violation of academic freedom." Historian Michael Kazin generously allowed, "I don't know if Daniels should be fired," before stipulating "he should be roundly condemned."

You would never guess from the hysterics that the low estimation that Daniels has for Zinn's work is shared by a swath of distinguished historians. It's not that they disagree with Zinn or believe he's too controversial. They think his work is, to borrow the word Daniels used in another email, "crap."


As Michael Moynihan pointed out in Reason magazine, much of the incoming fire comes from Zinn's more intellectually credible comrades on the left. Sean Wilentz describes Zinn's work as "balefully influential." Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. called him "a polemicist, not a historian." The New Republic recently ran a review of a biography of Zinn under the headline "Agit-Prof." Even the aforementioned Michael Kazin believes Zinn "essentially reduced the past to a Manichean fable."

"A People's History" is a book for high-school students not yet through their Holden Caulfield phase, for professors eager to subject their students to their own ideological enthusiasms, and for celebrities like Matt Damon, who has done so much to publicize it. If it is a revelation to you that we treated Native Americans poorly, and if you believe the Founding Fathers were a bunch of phonies, Zinn's volume will strike you with the power of a thunderclap. And one day, maybe, you will grow up.

The caterwauling in the Daniels controversy about the importance of academic inquiry is particularly rich, given that Zinn didn't believe in it. He had no use for objectivity and made history a venture in rummaging through the historical record to find whatever was most politically useful, without caring much about strict factual accuracy. "Knowing history is less about understanding the past than changing the future," he said. He joined his propagandistic purpose to a moral obtuseness that refused to distinguish between the United States and its enemies, including Nazi Germany.

Daniels was right not to want Indiana school kids to be subjected to Zinn in the classroom (what they choose to read on their own time is another matter), and right to worry that "A People's History" was part of teacher training. The former governor's critics are willing to look the other way at Zinn's transgressions against his own academic discipline; for them, defending a fellow man of the left and shouting "censorship" are more important and congenial pursuits than maintaining standards.

The sin of Mitch Daniels, it turns out, is to take history more seriously than they do.

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© 2012 King Features Syndicate

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