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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 24, 2012/ 5 Menachem-Av, 5772

Why Governor Calls Shooter 'Suspect A'

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper had the right idea when he refused to utter the suspected gunman's name in the Aurora multiplex theater shootings, which left 12 dead and 58 wounded. Instead of naming the alleged killer, Hickenlooper referred to him only as "Suspect A." At a prayer vigil Sunday, Hickenlooper read the names of each of the 12 people killed in the incident. After each name, the crowd repeated the refrain, "We will remember."

"We want to focus on the victims, survivors and first responders," the governor's spokesman, Eric Brown, explained, "not the killer."

Victim Jessica Ghawi's brother Jordan was one of the victim family members who met with President Barack Obama on Sunday. Afterward, Ghawi tweeted that Obama agreed not to name the shooter.

The president told the press that though "this perpetrator has received a lot of attention, that attention will fade away."

In 1999, two Columbine High School students killed 13 individuals before they killed themselves. There had been mass shootings before that dark day, but this outrage unleashed an at-times-unhealthy rush to explain what would motivate teenagers to murder their classmates and then themselves.

In killing other teenagers indiscriminately, the Columbine shooters turned themselves into cult heroes for the twisted. The Virginia Tech undergraduate who killed 32 students in 2007 left a video in which he referred to the Columbine killers as "martyrs."

In April, a former student opened fire at Oikos University in Oakland, Calif., leaving seven dead. Last year, a suspended college student critically wounded then-Rep. Gabby Giffords, D-Ariz., during a political event in a shooting spree that left six dead. Also last year, a fanatic went on a killing spree in Oslo that left 77 dead; most of his victims were attending a summer youth camp.

One thing all of these men have in common: They allowed themselves to be taken alive. They were not suicidal.

The accused Oikos shooter has pleaded not guilty.

The alleged Arizona shooter also has pleaded not guilty. Diagnosed with schizophrenia, he is taking medication intended to make him mentally fit for trial.

Though the Norwegian mass murderer admitted to killing 77, he claimed to have acted in political self-defense. His trial is over. Next month, an Oslo court is expected to rule on whether he was legally insane when he set a bomb near the prime minister's office and shot up the island summer camp.

There is a time and a place to examine who did what and why. But it is important to remember now that behind such senseless crimes, there was no reason. And just in case a quest for fame is a driver for these crimes, it's better not to feed that beast.

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© 2012, Creators Syndicate

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