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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review July 24, 2008 / 21 Tamuz 5768

Another WordPerfect? Why not?

By Mark Kellner

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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | When WordPerfect last made any significant headlines, or so it seems, then U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno had ordered up a bunch of licenses for the Department of Justice. Lawyers, it seems, love WordPerfect.


There have been a few revisions of the software since Ms. Reno's tenure, and the most recent, dubbed "X4," for 14, is the most recent. It's available for as little as $160 as part of a WordPerfect Office "suite" that includes a spreadsheet, presentation graphics program and other extras. It's not as inexpensive as the free OpenOffice.org suite, nor as costly as Microsoft Office 2007. But both the suite and the word processor are good values for what you get: something that is exceptionally compatible with Microsoft Office, and, on the word processing side, just about every program going back to WordStar, which means roughly the last 25 years.


There's much to like about WordPerfect X4 along with its extensive compatibility. The program has a clean appearance, and can operate in a "Microsoft Word" mode that makes it more familiar to users of that program. It has every bell and whistle that you'd want in a word processor, and, in a move particularly useful for those using small laptops, a "zoom to margin width" feature that'll make viewing what you type easier.


There's an auto-correction feature that'll flag misspelled words as you type, and many common transpositions are corrected as you type. There's an online dictionary and thesaurus, making it easier to bloviate in a document, if you so desire. However, the dictionary, provided by Oxford University Press, doesn't, for some odd reason, include a definition for that word, which means "to speak pompously," as an online reference put it.


I like the way WordPerfect works, and I could see myself writing a substantial paper or book using this program. That said, there are a few annoyances: there's a word counter at the bottom of the program screen, but you must click on the word count number to have it update. It's small potatoes, I guess, but I find this annoying: why can't the program just keep a running count, as the default mode? (Hint: Microsoft Word does exactly that.)


For those concerned about exporting the final results, I can only say that the range of ways to save a WordPerfect file should cover just about every need. I've found these file translations to be quite good, even if I doubt some are widely needed. If you're uncertain, publisher Corel Corp. will let you download a 30-day free trial version, at www.corel.com. That's not a bad way to try the program out.


My oft-stated belief bears repeating here: I like have a bunch of word processors to choose from, and WordPerfect X4 is a very good alternative for many users. If you're in the mood to switch, it's worth investigating.


NEED A GREAT LAPTOP STAND? May I recommend the Alto Connect from Logitech, which'll set you back about $80 at amazon.com. This thing is simplicity itself: two sturdy pieces of plastic that connect to form a "X" on which the notebook can rest. You get a proper viewing height (in my opinion) and it's easy to position the notebook so that a front-loading optical drive is accessible.


That's good enough, but add in four USB ports, including one specifically designed for "media" such as USB card readers, memory sticks and MP3 players, and you've got a real winner. The extra ports bridge to the computer's USB connector via an included cable. Yes, the stand needs external power to drive this connectivity, but it's a small price to pay, in my opinion.


I've seen all sorts of notebook stands, and the only thing that would, in my view, beat the Alto Connect is a product-specific stand costing double, triple or even quadruple the cost. For the money, I haven't seen a better desktop value, period. Details are at www.logitech.com.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Mark Kellner has reported on technology for industry newspapers and magazines since 1983, and has been the computer columnist for The Washington Times since 1991.Comment by clicking here.

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