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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 3, 2013/ 26 Sivan 5773

The Games Behind the Olympic Games

By Tom Purcell




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Washington, D.C., is in the grip of scandals, the economy is stumbling and a host of other challenges are weighing me down — which is why I prefer to dwell on more obscure subjects, such as a battle raging behind the scenes over the 2020 Olympics.

According to the Toronto Star, the International Olympic Committee shocked the world recently when it dropped wrestling from its list of core sports for the 2020 games — in favor of other sports more likely to interest younger viewers.

Well, the wrestling folks aren't going down without a fight. Wrestling is competing with seven other sports for a single 2020 opening: baseball/softball (baseball, cut in the past, is fighting for a new spot), squash, inline speed skating, sport climbing (rock climbing), wakeboarding (a form of water skiing), karate and wushu (kung fu fighting).

Personally, I think any of these eight sports would make for a great Olympic event. Sure, I might prefer racquetball over squash, but baseball is a great American-invented sport, inline speed skating is a blast to watch, rock climbing is scary and exhilarating, wakeboarding is hugely entertaining, and who doesn't want to see karate and kung fu fighting?



Besides, the choices could be plenty worse.

Yahoo News reports that, with the popularity of TV dancing contests, some are pushing to add ballroom dancing to the Olympic roster.

Sure, the games have not traditionally included "artistic" events, but ballroom enthusiasts argue that rhythmic gymnastics — in which gymnasts jump around with hoops, batons and brightly colored fabric — has been added to the Olympic list.

Sure, ballroom dancing requires athleticism and finesse. It is an art form celebrated by American greats Gene Kelly, Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire.

Then again, any American "sport" in which you can blow out a knee by tripping over the buffet table probably shouldn't quality as an Olympic event.

That brings us to pole dancing — that's right, pole dancing. According to the British newspaper The Independent, some hope this "sport" made popular by women who shed their clothes in smoky bars can one day become an Olympic event.

I'd pay good money (again) to see that.

Which brings us to bowling.

Chuck Pezzano of The Record, a New Jersey newspaper, says the bowling people have made several attempts to have their sport added to the Olympic roster over the years. During the 1936 games, they staged exhibitions and tournaments. Though well-received, bowling did not make the cut. They staged another exhibition at the Seoul Olympics in 1988, also without result.

Bowling "features men, women and children, (and is) well organized in more than 100 bowling federations around the world. There are no barriers because of size, age, sex or language. Rules are fairly simple ... . A country with thousands of bowling centers or a nation with one can develop a team or an individual to qualify for one of the events, despite limited budgets," Pezzano writes.

Better yet, bowling requires tremendous balance and stamina — only a true competitor can drink three pitchers of beer and still bowl a perfect 300.

Still, bowling has made little headway toward becoming an Olympic sport and is not likely to.

In any event, as America's capital goes into scandal overdrive and the country continues to go to hell in a handbasket, I wish all eight competing sports luck as they vie for a spot in the Olympics.

I will continue to follow their behind-the-scenes battles closely — as they offer a welcome respite from the sorry state that America's people, economy and politics are in these days.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR Contributor Tom Purcell, author of 'Misadventures of a 1970's Childhood,' is a nationally syndicated columnist. Comment by clicking here. To visit his web site, click here.


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