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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 22, 2011/ 20 Sivan, 5771

Who Is Gary Johnson?

By John Stossel




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Someone was missing from last week's Republican presidential debate, and that's too bad. He's an announced candidate who was a two-term governor of New Mexico, and he makes a case for strongly limited government.

Who is he? Gary Johnson. He was left off the platform because the sponsors say he didn't meet their criteria: an average 2 percent showing in at least three opinion polls.

But I grilled him because I think people might want to hear from him.

When he was governor, he vetoed 750 bills and shed a thousand state jobs. That made Republican and Democratic politicians mad, but in a state with a two-to-one Democratic advantage, this Republican was re-elected.

"I got re-elected … by saying no to the government," he told me. "I was a penny- pincher."

His political philosophy comes down to this:

"The government has a role to protect me against individuals that would do me harm — whether that be property damage or physical harm. The federal government has an obligation to protect us against foreign governments that would raise arms again us. But beyond that, government does way too much."

What about education?

"The number one thing that the federal government could do to improve education in this country would be to eliminate the Department of Education (and) give education back to the states — 50 laboratories of innovation … ."

Johnson is not a social conservative, which leads some political observers to say he has no shot at the GOP nomination — ever. He doesn't buy it.

"I respect the views of social conservatives," he said. Yet "I think that 60 percent of Americans describe themselves as fiscally conservative and socially liberal. I would argue that perhaps it's not socially liberal — that it's really classically liberal, which is the notion that less government is better government, the notion that (the) best thing that the government can do for me is to let me be the individual that I might be."

He takes a position on the drug war that differs from most Republicans, though it's not fully libertarian.

"I would legalize marijuana. … When it comes to all of the other drugs, we should look at the drug problem first as a health issue rather than a criminal justice issue."

Johnson believes the country is "just two years away from being at a tipping point" on marijuana.

"I have smoked marijuana. I have drunk alcohol, although I don't do either today," he said. "The big difference between marijuana and alcohol is that marijuana is a lot safer."

And what about foreign policy?

"I was opposed to Iraq from the get-go," he said. "I did not see a military threat from Iraq. … I think that military intervention in Libya is unwarranted. Where was the military threat from Libya? Where was the congressional authorization to go into Libya? Where in the Constitution does this say that because we don't like a foreign leader we should go in and topple that foreign leader? (We) need to look at the unintended consequences of these actions we take. … We do all of these good things in the name of liberty, and the consequence oftentimes is much different."

On trade and economics, Johnson is a true libertarian. He opposes tariffs and other government interventions.

"I believe in free markets," he said. "There is a magic to free markets. Department of Commerce might be a good one to eliminate. … What we do in this country is pass laws that advantage corporations, individuals, groups that are well-connected politically — as opposed to creating an environment where we all have a level playing field … access to the American dream."

Nor is he a fan of stimulus spending and bailouts.

"Banks that made horrible decisions were bailed out at all of our expense. They should have been allowed to fail."

I'm glad Johnson is in the race, along with Ron Paul. I don't hear a consistent limited-government message from Mitt Romney, Tim Pawlenty or Newt Gingrich. We sure didn't get one from George W. Bush or John McCain. I'm eager to hear more from Michele Bachmann and Herman Cain. I plan to talk with them soon.

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