Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 20, 2011 / 18 Sivan, 5771

Herman Cain's ‘Amateur Hour’

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | America is a free country, and radio talk-show host Herman Cain is free to run for president. Even with low-name recognition, the former Godfather's Pizza CEO polls well. Veteran pollster Scott Rasmussen ranks him third, with 10 percent of the GOP primary vote, behind former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann. His supporters seem enthusiastic. But they should understand one thing: Herman Cain cannot win because when it comes to politics, he is an amateur.

Cain's website opens with the slogan "Let's Get Real."

Not the Herman-ator's strong suit.

Cain can boast of a great American success story. A black man who grew up in the Jim Crow South, Cain is the son of a chauffeur and domestic worker who were determined that he graduate college. He did. Then he earned a master's degree. He applied himself. He rose through corporate America and became chief executive of Godfather's Pizza. Cain should be proud of his achievements.

In the political world, Cain has not fared as well. Larry Sabato, director of the University of Virginia's Center for Politics, summed up Cain's political experience as "losing badly in a Republican primary in his own state" — when Cain ran for a U.S. Senate seat in Georgia in 2004. It's not a plus for a presidential candidate when Republicans in his own state nominated someone else.

Cain became an Atlanta talk radio host, a commentator for Fox Business and an author. He knows how to speak provocatively. Witness his remarks about President Obama's Kenyan roots and his admission that he would not appoint qualified Muslims unless they could prove they are loyal Americans. In short, he made a name for himself by alienating people — the one thing you don't do if you want to win an election.

But the main reason Cain won't win is that most Republicans understand that a man who has never won an election or a battlefield has no business running for president. He was a great businessman, but that does not mean he can squeeze what he wants out of hostile lawmakers, outmaneuver treacherous allies or juggle the thousand parts of foreign policy.

Like many Republicans, I am a strong believer in citizen politicians.

When civilians enter the arena, they can bring outside-the- Capitol-dome common sense to a realm made overcomplicated by careerists who know how to cut deals but not how to get things done.

Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., is a great example. An obstetrician who entered politics in his 40s, Coburn declared war on earmarks and ethanol subsidies — and he has succeeded where career Republicans once dared not tread.

Ronald Reagan went from actor to politician. Please note: Reagan could not have been President Reagan without being California Gov. Reagan first.

Sabato noted that in 1980, when Democrats were painting Reagan as an extremist, "the most reassuring qualification that Reagan had was having run the nation's largest state (population-wise) for eight years — and it was still there."

Cain has a poor sense of timing. Obama did not have a thick political resume when he won the White House. If American voters are so dissatisfied with Obama in 2012 that they want to replace him, they are not going to choose a rookie — who never has won a showdown with other lawmakers, sat across the table from a foreign despot or withstood the pressure of a hardball election and triumphed — whose claim to fame is that he is a good talker.

In its early stages before voters have begun to focus seriously on the election, the 2012 GOP primary has shined the spotlight on vanity candidates (Newt Gingrich), vanity non-candidates (Sarah Palin) and vanity personified (Donald Trump).

Like Cain, Palin and Trump have a talent for saying glib things that suggest that there are easy fixes for entrenched messes. Take Cain's premise that not being a politician is a plus in a presidential election.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

Comment JWR contributor Debra J. Saunders' column by clicking here.

Debra J. Saunders Archives

© 2011, Creators Syndicate

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles