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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 27, 2011 / 25 Sivan, 5771

The hangman doesn't cometh

By Dale McFeatters




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | India, a nation of 1.2 billion with a severe unemployment problem is having a difficult time filling a particular job -- an official hangman.

A hangman is needed for a condemned man in the state of Assam, but, according to The New York Times, which brought word of this bizarre development, a call for applicants went unanswered: "The nation's handful of known hangmen had either died, retired or disappeared."

Certainly it was not a job with great career potential. India's last hanging was in 2004. India imposes the death penalty sparingly and carries it out reluctantly, perhaps 50 times or so since becoming independent in 1947.

Prison officials pride themselves on helping inmates with their appeals. Given the bureaucracy and inefficiency of the Indian legal system, the 345 people on death row will likely suffer death by old age rather than the noose.

Hanging in the United States, once common, has died out, so to speak, with death by injection becoming the preferred means of legal extinction. The last public hanging was in Owensboro, Ky., in 1936 and was last used as a form of execution in Delaware in 1996.

The raucous proceedings surrounding the purportedly private execution in 2006 of Saddam Hussein, with American representatives conspicuously absent, were of course captured by cell phone camera and quickly posted on the Web. Even though Saddam was irredeemably evil, many found the circumstances of his death unnecessarily coarse and morbid.

Hanging has been well studied. There is the short drop, the standard drop and the long drop. Still, a lot can go wrong. The Internet will fill you in on the details.

Iran, which hangs a lot of people, including once a 16-year-old girl for some sexual offense, is said to use a variant of something called "the upright jerker," which sounds like something Iran would use.

Prison officials turned to a noted family of hangmen, one of whose members had hanged one of the assassins of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, but the Times said the last family member to ply that particular trade, Mammu Singh, had died in May.

But then hope, if not exactly for the condemned, appeared.

Singh's oldest son, Pawan Kumar, says he will apply for the job, telling the Times, "I just want to continue the family legacy. I'm the fourth generation. You don't see many volunteers coming forward. I'm serving my country."

In addition to carrying on the family business and doing his patriotic duty, Kumar would get a monthly retainer of $75, which has to sound pretty good to somebody whose day job is selling clothes from the back of his bicycle.

Nothing is simple with the Indian bureaucracy and, said the Times, there are "rules and protocols governing hanging." Do you suppose there's a licensing exam? Do you suppose the application form asks you to submit samples of your work?

Life sentences seem so much easier.

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© 2011, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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