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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review June 26, 2006 / 30 Sivan, 5766

Wanted: Will Rogers

By Tom Purcell


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Things are mighty heated these days. Tempers are flaring and minds are closed. Here's the solution: the wit and wisdom of Will Rogers.

"The short memory of voters is what keeps our politicians in office."

"We've got the best politicians that money can buy."

"A fool and his money are soon elected."

Rogers spoke these words during the Great Depression, but they're just as true today. With 24-hour news channels, our memories are shorter than ever. And in the mass-media age, the politician who can afford the most airtime frequently wins.

"Things in our country run in spite of government, not by aid of it."

"Alexander Hamilton started the U.S. Treasury with nothing. That was the closest our country has ever been to being even."

"Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for."

Today, unfortunately, we're getting more government than we're paying for. We cover the difference by borrowing billions every year.

As the king of the velvet-tipped barb, Rogers never intended to be mean, but to bring us to our senses. One of his favorite subjects was to remind the political class that it worked for us, not the other way around.

"When Congress makes a joke it's a law, and when they make a law, it's a joke."

"You can't hardly find a law school in the country that don't, through some inherent weakness, turn out a senator or congressman from time to time ... if their rating is real low, even a president."

"The more you observe politics, the more you've got to admit that each party is worse than the other." That's for certain. I used to fault the Democrats for cronyism and reckless spending. But that was before Republicans took over.

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Rogers' thinking on American foreign policy really hits home today:

"Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock."

"Diplomats are just as essential to starting a war as soldiers are for finishing it. You take diplomacy out of war, and the thing would fall flat in a week."

"Liberty doesn't work as well in practice as it does in speeches."

Rogers was born and raised on a farm in Oklahoma. His wit reflected the heart of America — the horse sense, square dealing and honesty that were the bedrock of our success.

"When a fellow ain't got much of a mind, it don't take him long to make it up."

"This country is not where it is today on account of any one man. It's here on account of the real common sense of the Big Normal Majority."

Franklin Roosevelt, a frequent target of Rogers' barbs, understood how valuable Rogers' sensibility was during the years of the Depression:

"I doubt there is among us a more useful citizen than the one who holds the secret of banishing gloom ... of supplanting desolation and despair with hope and courage. Above all things ... Will Rogers brought his countrymen back to a sense of proportion."

A sense of proportion is clearly what we're lacking right now. We need to get it back quickly.

Not five years ago, we were attacked by people who hold an ideology we're still having trouble getting our arms around. At first we were united, but now we're badly divided. Nothing more brightens the day of those who wish us harm than division.

Just as bad, we've got a rapidly aging population — a Social Security and Medicare train wreck is just over the horizon — and there is no shortage of other woes we must resolve if we expect the American experiment to keep on rolling.

But instead of working to resolve our challenges, we snipe and point fingers and make absurd accusations. We forget we're not Democrats or Republicans, but Americans.

What we need now more than ever is the calm, clear perspective of Will Rogers. He offered some sound advice on how we can get started:

"If stupidity got us into this mess, then why can't it get us out?"

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