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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Recession dragged down birth rates for less-educated women

By Emily Alpert



A shift toward more-educated mothers could affect what motherhood looks like


JewishWorldReview.com |

LOS ANGELES — (MCT) Birthrates were dramatically reduced during the recession among women who did not finish high school, a development that far outpaced the drop among women with higher levels of education, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center.


Between 2008 and 2011, birthrates fell 13 percent among women who hadn't finished high school — nearly twice as much as for women who had earned bachelor's degrees or more, Pew found. The overall drop continued a trend among U.S. women for the past five decades.


"When people feel that their economic foundations are insecure, they're often reluctant to have a child," said Bradford Wilcox, director of the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia, which wasn't involved in the Pew study. "We've seen this for many years in places like Spain and Italy and Greece — a real problem of unemployment that is linked to low levels of fertility."


Declining birthrates among women without high school diplomas, combined with increased education for American women, has helped push the percentage of new mothers with at least some college education to its highest point ever, Pew found.

Census data reveal that between 1960 and 2011, the share of new mothers with at least some college education leaped from 18 percent to 66 percent.


Higher education levels among mothers can translate to benefits for their children, researchers have found. More highly educated mothers tend to have healthier babies who do better in school later, researchers have found. It is unclear, however, whether education is the reason, or whether educated mothers are different in other ways that help their children, such as being better off economically, Pew wrote.


A shift toward more-educated mothers could also affect what motherhood looks like: Less educated mothers are more likely to be unmarried and have their children at younger ages.


"More-educated moms means older moms," said Gretchen Livingston, a senior researcher with Pew. "On the one hand, some people would argue older moms are more mature moms." On the other hand, she said, some studies have indicated increased health risks for children of older mothers.


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Almost half of new mothers without high school diplomas were younger than 25, and only 3 percent of new mothers with bachelor's degrees were as young, Pew found. Among new mothers who didn't finish high school, 61 percent of were unmarried, compared with only 9 percent of women with bachelor's degrees or more.


When it comes to how women choose to form families, "education is a marker — or a divider — today in ways that it might not have been as much in the past," said Susan Brown, co-director of the National Center for Family and Marriage Research at Bowling Green State University.


Although women with less education have been less likely to become mothers during the recession, they still have more children, on average, than women who finish college. It is unclear whether that gap will shrink in coming decades, or whether less educated women who put off having children in bad economic times will simply have those children later, bringing their numbers back up.

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© 2013, Los Angeles Times Distributed by MCT Information Services



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