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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review May 26, 2009 / 3 Sivan 5769

Why the GOP will defeat Obama on healthcare

By Byron York


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Barack Obama is making an enormous mistake on the most important initiative of his presidency. In recent weeks, Obama has stressed that healthcare reform is the essential ingredient for the success of his economic-recovery plan. Yet the president, easily the most gifted White House communicator since Ronald Reagan, has the message all wrong.


"Our businesses will not be able to compete, our families will not be able to save or spend, our budgets will remain unsustainable unless we get healthcare costs under control," Obama said in his May 16 radio address. He has said the same thing on many other occasions, almost always stressing the threat of runaway cost. When Obama talks healthcare, it's cost, cost, cost.


But that's not what people want to hear — or at least not all they want to hear. Of course, they complain about the expense of medical treatment, but controlling cost is not their top healthcare concern.


"Americans will prioritize cost over quality right up until the moment they realize that it's their quality that they are sacrificing," writes the Republican pollster Frank Luntz in "The Language of Healthcare 2009," a brilliant new analysis of the public's healthcare concerns that also serves as a road map for defeating Obamacare. Basing his conclusions on extensive polling and focus-group research, Luntz writes that the public is very worried that a government takeover of healthcare — Obamacare — will result in politicians and government bureaucrats making decisions about what kind of care patients will receive and when they will receive it.


"Nothing else turns people against the government takeover of healthcare more than the realistic expectation that it will result in delayed, and potentially even denied, treatment, procedures and/or medications," Luntz writes. "When asked which was a higher priority — spending less on healthcare or being treated in a timely fashion — timely treatment beat cost almost unanimously."


People know that delayed and sometimes denied care is a way of life in other countries with national healthcare systems. And when they hear the president's repeated emphasis on cutting costs, they sense there's no way Obamacare cannot result in delayed and denied treatment. Luntz urges Republicans to make that the focus of their challenge to the president's plan. "It is essential that 'deny' and 'denial' enter the conservative lexicon immediately," Luntz writes, "because it is at the core of what scares Americans most about a government takeover of healthcare."


I called Luntz to discuss his memo. He didn't want to talk about it in partisan terms. Instead, he stressed that whoever wins the healthcare debate will "have to have a solution that addresses the individual nature of healthcare as well as the healthcare system itself, and have to have a solution to the uninsured problem that does not destroy personalized, humanized healthcare for everybody else."


And what might Barack Obama make of the memo? "If he's smart, he'll use it to amend some of his policies to address the concerns that the American people have," Luntz told me, "and he'll move congressional Democrats toward the center on issues like doctor/patient relationships and access to the right medications."


There is evidence that Democrats know they have a problem. On May 13, top White House aide David Axelrod hurried to the Capitol for a meeting with party leaders who are worried that the White House is losing the early message war. One participant, Sen. Richard Durbin, told reporters that Luntz's memo was "an interesting catalyst for us."


But the president continues to talk about cost. It's a trap he has made for himself. Without the savings Obama claims will result from healthcare reform, the crushing debt of the president's other spending priorities will become unsustainable. He has bet everything on his ability to cut healthcare costs. If that doesn't work, it all falls apart.


There's a consensus among the Washington punditocracy that healthcare reform will succeed this year because the time is simply right. But it's almost June. Obama and his Democratic allies have not even introduced a reform proposal, and yet the president says, "We've got to get it done this year." And all the while, he is sending out the wrong message on what really matters. Unless the White House changes course and pays more attention to what Americans really want, Obamacare will lose.

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Previously:



05/19/09 Rosy report can't hide stimulus problems
05/12/09 The Reagan legacy is the man himself
05/05/09 Sen. Specter, meet your new friends
04/27/09 Ted Olson: ‘Torture’ probes will never end
04/20/09 Who's Laughing at the ‘Axis of Evil’ today?
04/14/09 Congress needs Google to track stimulus money
04/06/09 Beyond AIG: A bill to let Big Government set your salary
03/30/09 On Spending and the Deficit, McCain Was Right
03/24/09 It's Obama's crisis now
03/17/09: Geithner-Obama economics: A joke that's not funny



© 2009, NEA

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