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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review May 27, 2005 / 18 Iyar, 5765

Guards of Honor

By Tom Purcell


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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Ted Pace served his country during WWII. Now 81, he and 21 other veterans are serving more than ever.

Four years ago, Pace, a member of American Legion Post 760, saw a problem. With WWII veterans dying in increasing numbers, he felt more needed to be done to recognize their military service during their funerals.

Though Congress mandated in 1999 that two active duty servicemen be available to participate in veterans' funerals, Pace wanted to do more. He established a full-fledged Honor Guard, recruiting from his post, as well as VFW Post 6664 located a few miles away. Soon 22 fellows had signed on, veterans who served in WWII, Korea and Vietnam and were eager to serve again.

This band of brothers participates in more than 270 funerals a year — sometimes five days a week, sometimes twice a day. At times they stand in the mud in the pouring rain. They've worked through blizzards and sub-zero temperatures. If their presence is requested, they will show.

They ask for nothing in return. They'll tell you it is their great honor to serve. Their service is all the more remarkable when you consider two-thirds of them are between 75 and 87 years old, well into their retirement years.

I met these incredible fellows a few months ago when my Uncle Jimmy was laid to rest. When I arrived I found them standing at attention. Their shoulders were square, their uniforms perfectly tailored, their shoes and buttons expertly polished. They carried on as though my uncle had been a general.

They saluted Jimmy when we carried his casket from the hearse into the chapel. With great precision and clarity, the chaplain, 87 year old Gene Frediani, recited a version of a soldier's prayer:

"It is the soldier who has given us all our freedoms. It's the soldier, not the reporter who has given us freedom of the press. It's the soldier, not the poet, who has given us freedom of speech. It's the soldier, not the campus organizer, who has given us the freedom to object. It's the soldier, not the lawyer, who has given us the right to a fair trail.

"It's the soldier who salutes the flag, who serves under that flag and whose coffin is draped under that beautiful flag, who has given us the freedom to comfortably sit in our living rooms each evening with our loved ones. Our dear comrade, Jimmy Hartner, we bid you farewell and we express our great gratitude for the part you played in ensuring us that we may always continue to have all these wonderful freedoms."

The chaplain said another prayer, then, in perfect unity, seven riflemen fired three shots. The bugler performed Taps on his horn. The chaplain took three bullet casings from his pocket — casings he had buffed and polished at home — and held them up.

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"These three spent cartridges represent Jimmy Hartner's rifle salute. They are symbols of duty, honor and love of country."

He placed the cartridges into the flag, which two active-duty servicemen took great pains to fold expertly. They handed it to my Aunt Celie and thanked her, on behalf of America, for Jimmy's service. It was a powerful display that left a roomful of people in tears.

Cynicism is running rampant these days, but it's impossible to be cynical in the presence of these Honor Guard men. In a free society, there should be debate about when to take up arms, but there is no debate about the men and women who serve. They deserve honor, respect and gratitude.

Such respect was denied my Uncle Jimmy when he returned from Vietnam. He never talked about his service and it soon became a part of his forgotten past. But as we laid him to rest, his sacrifice was powerfully remembered and celebrated thanks to 22 remarkable men.

This Memorial Day, as we remember those who have served, let's also remember those who continue to serve — particularly 22 Western Pennsylvania Honor Guard volunteers, who are ensuring that others are receiving the honor, respect and gratitude they deserve.

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