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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review May 5, 2005 / 26 Nisan, 5765

My Top-Six List on Career Advice

By Marty Nemko

Nemko
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http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | I thought I'd give you my Top-Six List: my six all-time favorite pieces of career advice.

#6. Don't focus on finding a dream career. Focus on getting your career non-negotiables met. It's extraordinarily competitive to land a good job in most dream careers: for example, law, investment banking, acting, art, sports, fashion, or TV. And once in, dream careers so often turn out to be disappointing. Because so many people want to be in those careers, bosses can demand absurd work hours, be unkind, etc.

In a less competitive career, you're more likely to find the things that truly do lead to career contentment: a kind boss, nice coworkers, opportunity to keep learning, a reasonable commute. As long as the compensation is middle-class, your happiness won't be impeded by the lack of a fat income. Study after study shows that beyond a modest middle-class income, additional money doesn't increase happiness. Yes, you will be happier with that new suit or brand new car for a short while, but that happiness usually fades. After that, you'll seek another material fix, and that too will soon wear off, whereupon you'll need yet another fix. Dan Pink, author of the new book, A Whole New Mind, calls this the hedonism treadmill.

#5. Work hard. My clients, who had been lazy, found that working hard turned out to be their greatest anti-depressant. Even if you're unemployed, you can and should work hard. Yes, work hard in looking for a job, but also fill your day to the rafters with constructive projects: volunteer to tutor someone, clean your cluttered apartment, and help a friend or relative.

#4. Be aware of the moment of truth. There is a moment when you— usually unconsciously— decide, "I'm going to do that task later." Stay alert for that moment of truth, and each time, ask yourself, "Would I be wiser to procrastinate this task or to do it now?" You'll procrastinate less. Then break the task down to baby steps and, when stuck, get help.

#3. Be nice. Look for opportunities to brighten the day of every person you encounter, even if it's just to flick a piece of lint off their jacket. If a coworker is less capable than you, repress your impatience and offer to help. If you're a boss, be generous with deserved praise. Many people crave praise more than money— feeling worthy is a primal need. If you have hired someone, don't ignore the unsuccessful applicants. Afford them the dignity of a kind rejection letter, if at all possible, a personal one mentioning their strengths.

#2. Integrity is all. My mouse pad is imprinted with the statement, "Integrity is All.". Yes, cheaters often win— in the material sense. Many, maybe even most deceptive salespeople, plagiarizing students, and cook-the-books accountants, get away with it, but they still lose. They lose in the bigger game of making their life meaningful. If you — especially when it's to your selfish detriment — do the ethical thing, you will be loved and respected on this earth, and if there's a hereafter, honored in that one. And you will go through life with your head high, knowing you are making the world a better, not a worse, place.

#1. Never look back. Always look forward. I learned that lesson from my dad. I asked him, a Holocaust survivor, why he never complained about having lost his teenage years and his entire family. He replied, "The Nazis took five years from my life. I won't give them one minute more. Martin, never look back; always look forward."

We've all had bad things happen to us, but my most successful clients do not wallow. They always ask themselves, "What's the next positive little step I can take." I can give you no better advice than that.

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