Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 15, 2013 / 5 Iyar, 5773

Abortion law's chickens coming home to roost

By Kathryn Lopez




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | In the face of the darkness that befell Newton, Conn., there has been an expectation of something more, but it doesn't have to do with legislation. Father Peter Cameron, a Dominican priest, preached to the families gathered at St. Rose of Lima Church there the Sunday after the school massacre about the hope that he saw in them.

In their need to love in the face of such darkness, he said, the grieving families were sharing a certainty with the world -- they were sharing a great, selfless gift.

Love, or more correctly, the lack of it, was something that came up on the floor of the House of Representatives recently. The headlines were about guns and immigration and the budget, but for one hour on the House floor, members talked about darkness emanating from Philadelphia. Led by Rep. Christopher Smith of New Jersey, members spoke of the details emerging in court about the case of Kermit Gosnell, an abortion provider accused of horrific crimes, including killing fetuses that were delivered alive.

Smith was direct in his words, hoping to do what the national media has failed to: tell the story. "Murdering newborns in the abortion clinic, it seems to me, is indistinguishable from any other child predator wielding a knife or a gun."

But our society doesn't see it that way. According to the confused morals of our time, doctors may kill a fetus if the mother wishes it. A mother may feel pressured to abort her fetus, through lack of options or lack of hope. She may not truly want to do it, but she may feel like she has no other choice. It's wrong, and it's poisoning our republic.

When Newtown was attacked, our instinct was to react politically. Our way of dealing with evil has become trying to legislate it away. In the case of Gosnell, though, it was legislation -- the laxness of regulations, yes, but also a legal climate that promotes the idea of unborn children as non-people, undeserving of care, love or even the briefest consideration -- that created a space for Gosnell to work.

As Dr. Andy Harris said on the House floor, the Gosnell case is just a logical extension of abortion law, which has created "an ethical framework completely consistent with abortion policy ... that a late-term, third-trimester fetus has no rights as a person."

With the Gosnell case as a harbinger, a future where babies are aborted because of their gender, or because they show signs of what our society could term "genetic weakness" is not too hard to imagine. And that's the worst nightmare of all.

In the relative silence about this case, there is a complacency that cannot stand. It was a lack of charity that drove women to Gosnell's, and they certainly found no love within the walls of his facility. The desensitization that 40 years of legal abortion has wrought must be undone. We must love and welcome all children, supporting mothers, building up fathers. The most dedicated abortion-rights activist, upon reflection, might agree.

We have been known to be a people of healthy expectations -- about the potential of life, about the heights we can reach. As government and law increasingly shut down that positive view of human potential, as the media and culture at large go out of their way to minimalize or outright ignore these issues, our complacency and indifference become an indictment, too.

Comment by clicking here.

Archives

© 2012, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles

Quantcast