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December 2, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Defending the Right to a Jewish State

Heather Hale: Compliment your kids without giving them big heads

Megan Shauri: 10 ways you are ruining your own happiness

Carolyn Bigda: 8 Best Dividend Stocks for 2015

Kiplinger's Personal Finance editors: 7 Things You Didn't Know About Paying Off Student Loans

Samantha Olson: The Crucial Mistake 55% Of Parents Are Making At Their Baby's Bedtime

Densie Well, Ph.D., R.D. Open your eyes to yellow vegetables

The Kosher Gourmet by Megan Gordon With its colorful cache of purples and oranges and reds, COLLARD GREEN SLAW is a marvelous mood booster --- not to mention just downright delish
April 18, 2014

Rabbi Yonason Goldson: Clarifying one of the greatest philosophical conundrums in theology

Caroline B. Glick: The disappearance of US will

Megan Wallgren: 10 things I've learned from my teenagers

Lizette Borreli: Green Tea Boosts Brain Power, May Help Treat Dementia

John Ericson: Trying hard to be 'positive' but never succeeding? Blame Your Brain

The Kosher Gourmet by Julie Rothman Almondy, flourless torta del re (Italian king's cake), has royal roots, is simple to make, . . . but devour it because it's simply delicious

April 14, 2014

Rabbi Dr Naftali Brawer: Passover frees us from the tyranny of time

Greg Crosby: Passing Over Religion

Eric Schulzke: First degree: How America really recovered from a murder epidemic

Georgia Lee: When love is not enough: Teaching your kids about the realities of adult relationships

Cameron Huddleston: Freebies for Your Lawn and Garden

Gordon Pape: How you can tell if your financial adviser is setting you up for potential ruin

Dana Dovey: Up to 500,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver disease. New Treatment Has Over 90% Success Rate

Justin Caba: Eating Watermelon Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

The Kosher Gourmet by Joshua E. London and Lou Marmon Don't dare pass over these Pesach picks for Manischewitz!

April 11, 2014

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg: Silence is much more than golden

Caroline B. Glick: Forgetting freedom at Passover

Susan Swann: How to value a child for who he is, not just what he does

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle Right Now

Sandra Block and Lisa Gerstner: How to Profit From Your Passion

Susan Scutti: A Simple Blood Test Might Soon Diagnose Cancer

Chris Weller: Have A Slow Metabolism? Let Science Speed It Up For You

The Kosher Gourmet by Diane Rossen Worthington Whitefish Terrine: A French take on gefilte fish

April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Apr 12, 2013 / 2 Iyar, 5773

Jewz in the Newz

By Nate Bloom






Jackie Robinson's Friend, Hank Greenberg; CNN's Jake Tapper; Texas County in the News is named for 19thC. Jewish soldier and Congressman

JewishWorldReview.com | Opening in theaters on Friday, April 12, is "42." The title references the player number of the great Jackie Robinson (1919-1972), the first African-American to play major league ball.

The film follows the college-educated Robinson (Chadwick Boseman), as he is selected by Branch Rickey (HARRISON FORD*, 70), the Brooklyn Dodgers General Manager, to break the "gentleman's agreement" that kept owners from signing black players.

Robinson agreed to Rickey's request that no matter how much racist abuse he suffered during his rookie season (1947) he would not react in kind with strong words or by fighting back.

Robinson let his talent do his talking for him. He was named the 1947 Rookie-of-the-Year. He earned the respect of his teammates and millions of fans with his stoic behavior and outstanding playing skills. His great rookie season paved the way for other black players.

Depicted in the film is one teammate who wouldn't play with Robinson (Dixie Walker) and players on other teams who directed racial slurs at Robinson or even tried to injure him: Ben Chapman, the Phillies' player/manger; and St. Louis catcher Joe Garagiola, now 87. Garagiola later re-invented himself as a genial sportscaster.

Robinson's allies included Dodger shortstop Pee Wee Reese, a white Southerner; Dodgers' pitcher Ralph Branca, now 87; and Hall-of-Fame first baseman HANK GREENBERG (1911-86).


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Branca, a devout Catholic who was the Dodgers' pitching ace during the 1947 season, found out in 2011 that his late mother was born Jewish. He told the reporter who discovered this fact that maybe her Jewish background led his mother to teach him to be tolerant of people of any background. Branca welcomed Robinson on his first day with a hearty handshake.

Greenberg, unlike the other players above, is not depicted in "42". However, the details of his friendship with Robinson are found in many sources, including the really terrific 1998 documentary "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg," directed by AVIVA KEMPNER.

In 1947, Greenberg was the Pirates first baseman (all his prior years were with the Tigers). During a May, 1947 game, Greenberg told Robinson, "Stick in there. You're doing fine. Keep your chin up." A couple of days later, Robinson told reporters that Greenberg was his "diamond hero" and "Class tells. It sticks out all over Mr. Greenberg."

CHECK OUT TAPPER (WHILE YOU CAN) Last month, JAKE TAPPER, 44, started as the host of a new CNN news program, "The Lead with Jake Tapper." (Airs 4-5 PM, EDT; 1-2; PDT). Tapper, the winner of many journalism awards, was ABC's Senior White House Correspondent from 2008-2012. The son of a Jewish father and a mother who converted to Judaism, Tapper attended a Philadelphia Jewish Day School. His wife, too, is a Jew-by-Choice, and his sister, a Conservative rabbi, presided over his wedding.


INTERESTED IN YOUR FAMILY HISTORY?

Ten years of doing a Jewish celebrity column has turned Nate Bloom into something of an expert in finding basic family history records and articles mentioning a "searched-for" person. During these 10 years, he has put together a small team of "mavens" who aid his research. Most professional family history experts charge at least a $1000 for a full family history. However, many people just want to get started by tracing one particular family line.

So here's the deal: Send Nate an e-mail at middleoftheroad1@aol.com, and tell him you saw this ad on Jewish World Review and include your phone number (area code too). Nate will contact you about doing a limited family history for a modest cost (no more than $100). No upfront cost. Open to everybody; of any religious/ethnic background.


Sadly, Tapper's early ratings are anemic. "The Lead" is informative. But it is traditional, "middle-of-the-road" reporting. Programs with a host with a strong point of view, like those on MSNBC and Fox News, are crushing CNN in the ratings.

Bill Maher boiled down these facts with this recent wry comment: "For the Left, there is MSNBC; for the Right, there is Fox; for airport lounges, there is CNN."

CNN has a pattern of recruiting seasoned, quite competent journalists from another network and then has them do a "down-the-middle" newscast that ultimately fails. This is what happened to Paula Zahn (her ex-husband is Jewish and her children were raised Jewish) and CAMPBELL BROWN, 44, another Jew-by-Choice (she converted under Orthodox auspices shortly before marrying former Bush Administration spokesperson DAN SENOR, 51.)

Zahn and Brown were heralded when hired as CNN program hosts and then quietly let go for tepid ratings. Tapper appears poised to follow them and that's a shame.

ODD NEWS FOOTNOTE On March 30, came the shocking news that the District Atty. of Kaufman County, Texas, and his wife, had been murdered in what appeared to be a pro hit. Two months earlier, a County asst. district attorney was shot and killed in front of the county courthouse. Suspected in the killings is a prison-based white supremacist gang.

If the gang did do the killings, it's "weird" that it happened in a county named after a Jew. The county is named for attorney DAVID S. KAUFMAN (1813-51), a Princeton-educated son of German Jewish immigrants.

Kaufman moved to the newly-independent Republic of Texas in 1837. There he fought (1839) and was seriously wounded in the main battle in a war with the Cherokees. When Texas became a State in 1845, he was elected to Congress and served almost three terms before dying in office. Texas would not send another Jew to Congress until 1979.

By the way, natives pronounce Kaufman County's name this way: "Kawf-Muhn." "Kaufman" means merchant in German and virtually all Germans and Austrians, Jewish or not, pronounce that name "Kouf-Muhn."

Hard to say if David Kaufman "went along" with what appears to be the tendency of Americans--- to pronounce the name "Kawf-Muhn."

You can hear the two variations on this site:

http://tinyurl.com/bv4sg4h


*Ford is the (lifelong) secular son of an Irish-American Catholic father and an American Jewish mother. In his first comic "Chanukah Song," ADAM SANDLER confused many by referring to Ford as "one quarter" Jewish. This is incorrect. Ford's mother was the child of two Jewish parents.

Info Note: Persons in capital letters, above, are deemed Jewish for the purpose of this column. For the purpose of the column, the person has to have at least one Jewish parent, be raised Jewish or secular, and not identify with a religion other than Judaism as an adult. Converts to Judaism are also, of course, considered Jewish, even if they don't have a Jewish parent.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in Washington and in the media consider "must reading." Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

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Previously:


The Back Story of the Ten Commandments (the film)--including Funny Stuff; Brit TV Dramas with a Jewish Connection

Paul Rudd and Nat Wolff co-star in New Comedy; Al Pacino Plays Phil Spector; Tribe Heavy "Girls"; An Oscar Winner's Orthodox Son

Bonnie Franklin, Valerie Harper; LA mayor's race; Albert Brooks on going to Shul

The Land of Oz's Many Hebrews; Mila Kunis & a "Menschy" Company; Aly Raisman Dances & Jewish Figure Skaters at World Championship

New on the Big Screen, Tube

The Oscars: The Jewish Connection

Jews in the National Hockey League; Possible Start of a Blockbuster Film Series; Star Wars Keep on Comin', Special TV Showing of Schindler's List



© 2013, Nate Bloom