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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 18, 2011 / 14 Nisan, 5771

Doubling down on a bad bet

By Mark Steyn



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | I always enjoy the bit in "Planet Of The Apes" where a loinclothed Charlton Heston falls to his knees as he comes face to face with a shattered Statue of Liberty poking out of the sand and realizes that the eponymous simian planet is, in fact, his own – or was. Also the bit in "Independence Day" where Lady Liberty gets zapped by space aliens. And in "Cloverfield" when she's decapitated by a giant monster. And in "The Day After Tomorrow" when she's flash-frozen after polar ice-cap melting brought on by a speech from Dick Cheney. I've been enjoying such moments, since, oh, the short story "The Next Morning" in the 1887 edition of Life, illustrated with a pen-and-ink drawing of a headless statue with the smoldering rubble of the city behind her. The poor old girl was barely off the boat from France, and she'd already been pegged as the perfect visual shorthand for societal collapse.

But the United States Postal Service has now gone the Hollywood apocalyptics one better and produced a somewhat subtler image of civilizational ruin. The other day the post office apologized for its new stamp honoring Lady Liberty. Due to an unfortunate error, the stamp shows not the 19th century Statue of Liberty that stands in New York Harbor but the 1990s replica that stands at the New York-New York hotel and casino in Las Vegas.

An ersatz statue of pseudo-liberty standing guard over the world's biggest gambling operation: What better way to round out a week in which the Republicans pretended to pass the most historically historic budget cut in history while the president pretended to come up with a plan to address the debt? All while pretending to wage a war in Libya whose most likely outcome seems to be that the only Arab dictator to sleep soundly in his bed at night during these turbulent times will be doing so under cover of a NATO no-fly zone for the rest of his 75-year term of office. In such a world, the USPS, bless 'em, has come up with a far more plausible emblem of societal devastation than Hollywood's space monsters and climate-change fairies.

After the revelations that the $38.5 billion 2011 budget cut will, in reality, either cut a mere $352 million from the 2011 budget or, in fact, increase it by $3 billion, it might be easier just to build a replica White House, Capitol and Congressional Budget Office at the new Beltway Casino next to Caesar's Palace. Vegas is no longer the world's biggest gambling resort; America is. Barack Obama says we need to "win the future," and one more roll of the dice should do it: A trillion dollars of chips on the stimulus came up empty but let's pile another couple trillion on Obamacare, and "high-speed rail," and "green jobs" and "broadband access... ." And all the while Wayne Newton is singing "Danke Schoen" in Chinese. But don't worry, we're not just throwing our money away. We're playing to a system! The president calls it "investing in the future."



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How do you "invest in the future"? By borrowing $188 million every hour. That's what the Government of the United States is doing. It's spending one-fifth of a billion dollars it doesn't have every hour of every day of every week – all for your future!

Most of the "futures" we've "invested" in are already at record levels of spending. Obama and his speechwriters are among the laziest men in the republic, so they cite the same dreary examples every time. In all three of his State of the Union addresses, he's brought up the highway system, and he did so again in Chicago at the end of the week. If the Republicans get their way, he said, "we can't invest in roads and bridges and broadband and high-speed rail. I mean, we would be a nation of potholes."

That's the choice, is it? Multitrillion-dollar government "investment" or a nation of potholes? America "invests" a lot in roads. It has more highway signs than almost any other country: not just mile markers but fifth-of-a-mile markers; not just "Stop" signs, but four-way "Stop" signs, and "Stop Sign Ahead" signs, and, one day soon, "Stop Sign Ahead Sign Ahead" signs. America also has the worst automobile fatality rate in the developed world, in part because there's so much fascinating reading material on the shoulder. Our automobile fatality rate is three times that of the Netherlands, about the same as Albania, down at 62 in the global rankings, just ahead of Tajikistan and Papua New Guinea. But don't worry, if we ever do become "a nation of potholes," you can bet there'll be federally mandated "Pothole Ahead" signs in front of each one.

Anything else? "Our airports," continued the president, "would be worse than places that we used to call the Third World, but who are now investing in infrastructure." Maybe he should get out of the motorcade once in a while and swing by LAX or LaGuardia: They're already decrepit cheerless dumps, mainly because they've been lavishly governmentalized into bureaucratic holding pens through which the citizenry dutifully shuffle while armies of crack TSA operatives poke around in the panties of 6-year-old girls.

Oh, and let's not forget "education." "We should invest in education," says the president. But we have done, spectacularly. We spend more per pupil on "education" than any other developed nation except Switzerland, and our math scores barely make the global Top 40, scraping in at big hit sound No. 35 between Azerbaijan and Croatia, the former of which was a Commie dictatorship until 20 years ago while the latter was reduced to rubble in the Yugoslav civil war. Maybe, when it comes to "investing in the future," civil war gives you more bang for the buck.


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It's the end of the world as we know it…      Someday soon, you might wake up to the call to prayer from a muezzin. Europeans already are.
     And liberals will still tell you that "diversity is our strength"—while Talibanic enforcers cruise Greenwich Village burning books and barber shops, the Supreme Court decides sharia law doesn't violate the "separation of church and state," and the Hollywood Left decides to give up on gay rights in favor of the much safer charms of polygamy.
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