Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 12, 2011/ 8 Nissan, 5771

Tax-Time Miseries

By Tom Purcell




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Boy, are accountants going through a rough patch now -- even rougher than we taxpayers are.

Despite software that has greatly simplified tax preparation, American accountants suffer a host of daily aggravations.

They're responsible for filing on behalf of some 82 million U.S. taxpayers and for understanding the U.S. tax code's 5,600 incomprehensible pages, according to AccountingToday.com.

No wonder, then, that the American accountant suffers "a poor work/life balance, botched sleep schedules, poor eating habits, and problems in personal relationships."

One survey found 64 percent complain that their clients, far more confused by the tax code than they, are careless or unprepared.

I hope our accountants can forgive us.

The same survey says our emotions get in the way of organizing our tax information in a timely manner:

"Procrastination (45 percent) is one of the biggest challenges for those who haven't filed in a suitable timeline by this time of year.

"Others blame nervousness about filing taxes correctly (28 percent), confusion and the process (26 percent), laziness (23 percent), and lack of organization (20 percent)."

I could toss in extended happy hours, but I don't believe that was on the list.

The survey describes other things agitating accountants.

Thirty-six percent complain about the need to resolve complex tax situations, 23 percent about "aggressive clients" -- who probably want to know why they owe so much after spending hours organizing business expenses and deductions.

And client deductions are a sizable source of grief.

AccountingToday.com cites one client who tried to depreciate his cows.

Another tried to deduct the costs of raising a cat. A third tried to deduct his hot tub for medical purposes.

A fourth "tried to claim water bottle costs towards health care since his doctor told him he needed to drink more water."

If such deductions sound reasonable -- they do to me -- you are among a rapidly shrinking group: Americans who actually have jobs, incomes and high taxes.

Again, I hope our accountant pals can forgive us. The survey says 60 percent of us feel mighty uneasy about being audited.

"That's more than those who are worried about other nerve-wracking situations, such as receiving a performance review at work (39 percent) or visiting the doctor for an annual checkup (35 percent)."

The article doesn't say what kind of doctor, but it's surely a proctologist -- whose procedure's surely far less intrusive than an audit!

In any event, at this cruddy time of year, many are miserable and uneasy.

About to write massive checks, we're sickened to see our bank balances depleted.

We're more sick that our combined annual contributions are $1.7 trillion less than our government will spend this year.

We're sicker yet that we have to hand over fat checks to our accountants to make sure we comply with that incomprehensible tax code.

Of course, our accountants get the worst of it all. Taxpayers themselves, they must work ungodly hours to put our taxes in order.

I hope they can deduct their poor work/life balance and eating habits.


Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

Comment on JWR Contributor Tom Purcell's column, by clicking here. To visit his web site, click here.


ARCHIVES

© 2011, Tom Purcell

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles