Home
In this issue
April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review April 7, 2006 / 9 Nissan, 5766

An ink jet for the office

By Mark Kellner

Printer Friendly Version
Email this article

http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | With monochrome laser printers available for around $100 from reputable sellers such as Samsung and Dell, why spend around twice as much, at list price, for a color inkjet?


Because, I suppose, the world isn't just black and white, even if a good chunk of our printing is.


The Hewlett-Packard OfficeJet K550 is far from a romantic name, and there's probably little luster attached to computer printers. At the same time, try to get along without one: it's tough, as I discovered when a multi-function unit died on me about 10 days ago, sparking the HP's unpacking and installation.


I'm sorry I waited for a breakdown: the K550, list price $199, but available for less via mail order, is a very impressive office machine. The text quality is as good as any laser and its color printing isn't at all shabby. Some other critics — notably the estimable printer maven M. David Stone of PC Magazine — fault the unit on its photo printing, but I have before me a rather large color image printed on plain paper that looks just fine.


In short, this is a unit that has a lot to offer, and at a reasonable price. Yes, there are far less expensive inkjet machines, but the K550 impresses me as a durable printer that can stand up to a fair amount of heavy use and even punishment. That's important, I believe, since office users tend to be rough on printers.


Appearance-wise, this is a machine more styled for the office than for the home: its case is mostly dark black, with a splash of metal and a semi-clear door for the separate ink tanks this printer uses. Unlike many inkjets, the K550 utilizes two print heads and four ink tanks; the idea, I believe, is that the ink cartridges will be replaced more often than the printheads. This could even out the cost of ink a bit; there are also standard and "large" ink cartridges available for the machine. One plus, of course, is that separate tanks are more sensible in that you replace each color as it runs out.


The unit has a 250-sheet paper tray, and a rather sturdy one, too. You can pull out your regular paper to insert and print envelopes, but I haven't found an easy way to "bypass" the tray and print a single envelope or page of business cards. That said, a sheet of pre-perforated cards traveled through the K550 without a hitch: there was no damage to the card stock, and the printed cards were, in a word, perfect.


In fact, "perfect" is what could be said for all of my output with this printer so far. I would like to find fault, but the blacks are black, the reds are red, and intermediate shades are rendered faithfully. That's the kind of thing we want our printers to do, and this HP unit does it very, very quickly. From hitting the "print" button in Microsoft Word 2004 for Mac until the paper popped out of the printer, a mere 30 second elapsed. That's not bad, and again, this is quality virtually indistinguishable from a laser.


When you factor color into the process, things get more exciting, I believe, since now it's a combo of speed AND color. This printer also plays quite nicely with Apple Computers' Mac OS X as well as Microsoft Corp.'s Windows, via a speedy USB connection. It can also be networked via Ethernet and a duplex unit, for automatic two sided printing, is available.


Overall, this is a very nice machine for a small office — or even one at home. I'm glad it's on my desk right now. Details at www.hp.com.


Read Mark's Tech blog daily

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in in the media and Washington consider "must-reading". Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

JWR contributor Mark Kellner has reported on technology for industry newspapers and magazines since 1983, and has been the computer columnist for The Washington Times since 1991.Comment by clicking here.

Archives

© 2006, News World Communications, Inc. Reprinted with permission of The Washington Times. Visit the paper at http://www.washingtontimes.com

Columnists

Toons

Lifestyles