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December 2, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Defending the Right to a Jewish State

Heather Hale: Compliment your kids without giving them big heads

Megan Shauri: 10 ways you are ruining your own happiness

Carolyn Bigda: 8 Best Dividend Stocks for 2015

Kiplinger's Personal Finance editors: 7 Things You Didn't Know About Paying Off Student Loans

Samantha Olson: The Crucial Mistake 55% Of Parents Are Making At Their Baby's Bedtime

Densie Well, Ph.D., R.D. Open your eyes to yellow vegetables

The Kosher Gourmet by Megan Gordon With its colorful cache of purples and oranges and reds, COLLARD GREEN SLAW is a marvelous mood booster --- not to mention just downright delish
April 18, 2014

Rabbi Yonason Goldson: Clarifying one of the greatest philosophical conundrums in theology

Caroline B. Glick: The disappearance of US will

Megan Wallgren: 10 things I've learned from my teenagers

Lizette Borreli: Green Tea Boosts Brain Power, May Help Treat Dementia

John Ericson: Trying hard to be 'positive' but never succeeding? Blame Your Brain

The Kosher Gourmet by Julie Rothman Almondy, flourless torta del re (Italian king's cake), has royal roots, is simple to make, . . . but devour it because it's simply delicious

April 14, 2014

Rabbi Dr Naftali Brawer: Passover frees us from the tyranny of time

Greg Crosby: Passing Over Religion

Eric Schulzke: First degree: How America really recovered from a murder epidemic

Georgia Lee: When love is not enough: Teaching your kids about the realities of adult relationships

Cameron Huddleston: Freebies for Your Lawn and Garden

Gordon Pape: How you can tell if your financial adviser is setting you up for potential ruin

Dana Dovey: Up to 500,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver disease. New Treatment Has Over 90% Success Rate

Justin Caba: Eating Watermelon Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

The Kosher Gourmet by Joshua E. London and Lou Marmon Don't dare pass over these Pesach picks for Manischewitz!

April 11, 2014

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg: Silence is much more than golden

Caroline B. Glick: Forgetting freedom at Passover

Susan Swann: How to value a child for who he is, not just what he does

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle Right Now

Sandra Block and Lisa Gerstner: How to Profit From Your Passion

Susan Scutti: A Simple Blood Test Might Soon Diagnose Cancer

Chris Weller: Have A Slow Metabolism? Let Science Speed It Up For You

The Kosher Gourmet by Diane Rossen Worthington Whitefish Terrine: A French take on gefilte fish

April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Keeping troops alert with brain stimulation

By Barrie Barber


Staff Sgt. William Raybon is fitted with electrodes on his head and forearm at Wright-Patterson Air Force Research Laboratory in Ohio



Military-tested technique could be alternative to drugs


JewishWorldReview.com |

W RIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio — (MCT) Tired troops may get a jolt out of a late-night caffeine boost, but researchers at the Air Force Research Laboratory say they may have found a better way to fight fatigue.

A mild electric stimulation has proven in a research study of about 175 volunteers to be more effective for longer times than caffeine, said R. Andy McKinley, a 711th Human Performance Wing biomedical engineer in the Human Effectiveness Directorate.

"We found this really helps keep your attention on task," McKinley said.

BETTER TRAINING

Imagery analysts, cyber and unmanned aerial vehicle operators, could be more alert with long hours staring at computer screens, and research findings suggest students could train up to twice as fast or more, researchers said.

"This would be a real benefit if we can accelerate that learning time, and our results have been really promising in that," said Lindsey McIntire, a Human Performance Wing project research psychologist.

The technology could find its way into control rooms and classrooms within five years if the Air Force pursues the new fatigue-fighting method, McKinley said.

"I think we're past the proof of concept phase and we're trying to move toward something we can apply," he said.

The technique is called transcranial direct-current stimulation. Short-term tests have shown few side effects, he said. But more research into the Air Force initiative, called Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation and tested on active-duty airmen at Wright-Patterson, is needed prior to fielding it.

"Basically, we need to understand what the effects will be of using this every day," McKinley said.


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The Wright State Research Institute expects to start similar experiments on student volunteers and airmen this spring in collaboration with Air Force research, said Michael Weisend, an Institute senior research scientist in the neuromedical imaging program.

"We will start to move this technology into more real-world situations," he said.

Weisend arrived from the Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, N.M., to start the Wright State program.

"If you do this with carefully trained people in a lab setting, the risks are very low," he said. But treatments at home by the inexperienced have in some cases led to burns or rashes, he cautioned.

AVOIDING DRUGS

The mild stimulation technique, narrowly focused on the brain, could be an alternative to pharmaceutical drugs spreading throughout the body and impacting other organs, he said.

"The normal solution to lots of problems we have with our brain is to take a drug," he said.

The 711th Human Performance Wing has partnered with George Mason University, Georgia Institute of Technology and Duke University in the stimulation studies, also.

George Mason has for several years conducted trans cranial direct-current stimulation experiments on hundreds of college students and a handful of older adults, said Pamela Greenwood, an associate professor at the university in Fairfax, Va. The Air Force gave the university a $7.5 million, five-year grant in 2010 to study neuroergonomics, or how to improve how the brain functions at work, and in other settings, among other tasks.

Research shows potential to slow cognitive decline in later years. "If you could simply slow decline to allow people to function longer that would be a real benefit," she said. It's too early to reach definitive conclusions in the university's studies, however. The experiments on about 10 older adults weren't funded through the Air Force, she noted.

At Georgia Tech, researchers have employed magnetic imaging resonance to scope areas of the brain best suited to sustain attention, said Eric Schumacher, associate professor of psychology.

"One thing that was novel was just how dynamic our brain systems were," he said. "Even when we are trying to pay attention our brain systems are fluctuating in and out of trying to do that." The university in Atlanta has sent students to work as researchers in the experiments at Wright-Patterson.

Experiments will start using transcranial magnetic stimulation, or magnetic forces instead of electricity, to stimulate the human brain to spot images faster in photographs, said Bruce Luber, a Duke University experimental psychologist in Durham, N.C., collaborating in the research.

"There may be ways to train people to use this kind of technology to train people faster and get them better than they would be in the first place," Luber said.



TESTING THE TECHNOLOGY

In a small lab room last week inside the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Staff Sgt. William Raybon has one set of electrodes, wrapped in surgical mesh, on his right bicep and a second set on the left side of his head over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

Looking at a computer screen blanketed with hollowed-out red squares and blue circles against a field of white, he'll tap a key on the keyboard every time he spots a red circle. The screen changes every seven seconds while two small cameras under the screen track his eye movements.

A person wearing the electrodes may briefly feel a slight tingling, itchy or warm sensation, McKinley said. Seven percent of the research subjects have complained of a slight headache afterwards, he said.

It was at least the fourth time Raybon participated in the experiment, one the medical lab technician said he volunteered for out of curiosity. He said he has had no side effects.

In a prior experiment, he stayed awake for 30 hours, then had the stimulation to test his response to perform tasks.

Afterwards, the airmen "had no fatigue at all, really."

"I was shocked by that because I'm not a morning person," he said.

The Air Force study showed people who stayed awake 30 hours, and then had a mild electric stimulation for about half an hour stayed alert another six hours compared to an hour or two after consuming caffeine, McKinley said. They had a better mood, were less drowsy and more energized, researchers said.

"Caffeine had a benefit initially but it went away pretty quick," he said.

Researchers tested memory and reaction times between electric stimulation and caffeine and found no notable difference, McKinley said.

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