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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review March 11, 2013/ 29 Adar, 5773

More options needed for women

By Kathryn Lopez




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Recently, a group of women gathered to insist that expanded abortion access be a legislative priority in New York. Why they would feel the need to do so is a good question, one with disturbing overtones.

The state's governor is inexplicably pushing for greater abortion availability in a state where abortion already appears to be quite popular. We used to hear talk of "safe, legal and rare," but now we see numbers that show more than 100,000 abortions in New York each year. And yet advocates of legal abortion are banding together to insist that expanded abortion access remain a part of the governor's "Women's Equality" agenda.

The current proposed legislation has been floating around Albany for years. It's gone nowhere, because New Yorkers know that abortion access isn't a problem in their state. And when they are made aware of the numbers, there's some consensus that they are too high. You'd think we'd take advantage of that opportunity to make some progress. But we have become so accustomed to taking sides or dodging the issue that it has become easy for those with the loudest megaphones to dominate the conversation.

Access has become one of those misleading words like "choice" and "equality," proffered to obscure a radical agenda. But there are people who can help. And whatever our political and moral positions on one procedure or policy or another, we ought to help these people and the choices they represent flourish, instead of pushing them to the margins.

"It is crazy," Theresa Bonopartis, director of Lumina, a post-abortion ministry in the New York metropolitan area, observes about our current conditions. "What we were sold as a bill of goods was the necessity of abortion for the health of women, but this great 'right' has become out of control and more protected than the women it claims to serve."

This debate in New York is happening while the trial of Dr. Kermit Gosnell is beginning just a bit down the northeast corridor in Philadelphia. Gosnell, who ran a profitable abortion operation, is accused of murdering seven newborns and one pregnant woman. The grand jury report sums it up: "This case is about a doctor who killed babies and endangered women." The report detailed gruesome conditions at Gosnell's practice and the horrific butchery he's accused of. It is not, to put it mildly, for the weak of stomach. "Over the years, many people came to know that something was going on here. But no one put a stop to it," the report states.

With that in the background, you'd think we'd be a little more sober and urgent about actually protecting women and considering what we can do for their unborn children.

"War on women" rhetoric shuts progress down. Bonapartis offers: "I think it gets to a dead end because it looks at either the baby or the mother ... we need to address both. Both are loved by God both before and after abortion ... You can be against abortion ... while at the same time offering compassion and help to those suffering."

As commentators continue to voice their hopes that the next pope will follow the doctrines of sexual liberation, I am stuck on a tweet. "Be careful not to make a woman cry, for G0D counts her tears!" Italian Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi tweeted that Talmudic wisdom as he was leading a retreat during the final days of Pope Benedict's papacy. The next time you hear someone dismiss a pro-life position, be grateful there is someone to count the tears, and following God's lead in trying to wipe them away and prevent more.

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