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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review March 1, 2013 / 19 Adar, 5773

New on the Big Screen, Tube

By Nate Bloom







JewishWorldReview.com | NEW ON THE BIG SCREEN Opening on Friday, Mar, 1, is "21 and Over," a raunchy comedy co-written and co-directed by JON LUCAS, 36, and Scott Moore. They are best known for writing the original "Hangover" movie. The plot: straight-A college student Jeff Chang is always well-behaved. His two best friends, Casey and Miller, surprise him by dropping-by the night before his med school interview. One thing leads to another and what was supposed to be one beer turns into a night of chaos and over indulgence.

SKYLAR ASTIN, 26 (born Sylar Astin Lipstein), plays Casey, with JONATHAN KELTZ, 25, ("Entourage") appearing in a supporting role ("Randy"). Astin was a star of the hit Broadway musical, "Spring Awakenings," and co-starred in 2012 film musical, "Pitch Perfect."

Lucas recently said: "21 is where [sic] you go out with all your friends. We call it the American Bar Mitzvah in the movie, because it is oddly this day when America recognizes you as a grownup. You can now do everything you haven't been able to do."

NEW ON THE TUBE: MOB MOM, FASHION, AND FUNNY PARODY The new ABC series, "Red Widow," starts this Sunday, Mar. 3, at 9PM. It was created by, and is mostly written by MELISSA ROSENBERG, 50 (who wrote the screenplays for the "Twilight" films).

The series stars Radha Mitchell as a California woman whose late husband was in the Russian Mafia. After he is murdered, she has to agree to work for the Mob to save her life and the lives of her children.

Pretty redhead JAIME RAY NEWMAN, 34, who went to a Detroit-area Hillel Day School for her primary school education, and has been in several short-lived TV shows, has a supporting role ("Katrina").


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The fifth season of the Bravo reality series, "The Rachel Zoe Project," premieres at 9PM on Wednesday, March 6. The new season follows ZOE, 41, and her husband/business partner RODGER BERMAN, 42, as they expand her women's wear collection and open a hair salon. Their infant son, SKYLAR, is often seen.

Starting the same night, at 10:30PM, is the new Bravo series, "Dukes of Melrose." It features prominent boutique fashion store owners CAMERON SILVER, 43, and Christos Garkinos. We see them as they show off their collections of vintage couture and buy and sell great pieces that were often owned by celebrities. In the premiere show, the duo is shown getting "A-List" celebs ready for the Oscars.

Last November, Silver spoke to the London Jewish Chronicle about his new book, "Decades: A Century of Fashion." He had some interesting things to say about Jews in fashion: "In recent years [I've] noticed a real decline in the number of aspiring Jewish designers. It was all about DONNA KARAN, RALPH LAUREN, CALVIN KLEIN …but they are now the old guard. ALBER ALBAZ at Lanvin is wonderful…But there are not that many young ones. It's also not the schmutter business it once was as it's now all about conglomerates and there is so little manufacturing done in the US. There are lots of Jewish CEOs, but I fear the artistry has gone."

(In this context, "schmutter," a Yiddish word, references a time when most American clothes were made by small, domestic manufacturers—often Jewish manufacturers. It wasn't a high prestige industry for the most part. But it was fairly easy to get off the ground as a manufacturer. It also was very possible for a talented young designer—like Calvin Klein et al—to find a small U.S.-based manufacturer who would give him a chance to learn his trade in "the real world".)


INTERESTED IN YOUR FAMILY HISTORY?

Ten years of doing a Jewish celebrity column has turned Nate Bloom into something of an expert in finding basic family history records and articles mentioning a "searched-for" person. During these 10 years, he has put together a small team of "mavens" who aid his research. Most professional family history experts charge at least a $1000 for a full family history. However, many people just want to get started by tracing one particular family line.

So here's the deal: Send Nate an e-mail at middleoftheroad1@aol.com, and tell him you saw this ad on Jewish World Review and include your phone number (area code too). Nate will contact you about doing a limited family history for a modest cost (no more than $100). No upfront cost. Open to everybody; of any religious/ethnic background.


The E! Channel has picked-up, for TV broadcast, the very funny web comedy series, "Burning Love," a parody of "The Bachelor" TV show. Produced by BEN STILLER, 47, the series follows a narcissistic firefighter Mark Orlando (Ken Marino) looking to find "true love." A second season of the web show has already been filmed, but E! is starting with the first season. MICHAEL IAN BLACK, 42, co-stars as the host of the "Bachelor"-like show.New episodes air Mondays at 7PM and the first show aired last Monday. But re-runs are shown every day, including today, Mar. 1, at 8AM, 11AM, and 6PM.

Info Note: ,
Persons in capital letters, above, are deemed Jewish for the purpose of this column. For the purpose of the column, the person has to have at least one Jewish parent, be raised Jewish or secular, and not identify with a religion other than Judaism as an adult. Converts to Judaism are also, of course, considered Jewish, even if they don't have a Jewish parent.

Every weekday JewishWorldReview.com publishes what many in Washington and in the media consider "must reading." Sign up for the daily JWR update. It's free. Just click here.

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Previously:


The Oscars: The Jewish Connection

Jews in the National Hockey League; Possible Start of a Blockbuster Film Series; Star Wars Keep on Comin', Special TV Showing of Schindler's List



© 2013, Nate Bloom