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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

6 things to know about concierge medicine

By Lisa Gerstner






You can avoid packed waiting rooms--if you're willing to pay extra. A small but growing number of doctors are using the concierge model to offer more-personalized care. Here's how it works:

1. THE DOCTOR WILL SEE YOU ASAP. Among the perks of concierge medicine are the ability to contact your physician at any time and to schedule same-day appointments. In return for this enhanced service, patients pay an annual or monthly fee, which often totals about $1,200 to $5,000 per year, estimates Michael Friedlander, of Specialdocs Consultants.

Doctors who practice in expensive areas tend to charge the highest fees; a high fee may also mean that they limit their practice to fewer patients.

2. GETTING TO KNOW YOU. The opportunity to build a relationship with a doctor is a top selling point for concierge service. Plus, your annual physical may include preventive procedures that insurance plans are not required to cover under the Affordable Care Act, such as an expanded blood panel and screening for Alzheimer's disease.


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Louis Malinow, a Baltimore, Md., internist with a concierge practice, says that he is able to give patients quicker diagnoses. For example, he was able to order tests and read the results in a matter of days for a patient with possible metastatic cancer, then arrange a biopsy that showed the patient had a much less serious condition. The process would likely have taken weeks at his former practice--and left the patient anxiously awaiting results for much longer.

3. FIND THE RIGHT DOC. Start with the American Academy of Private Physicians , which offers a search tool to locate concierge doctors by state. Or, search through a network of concierge physicians, such as MDVIP. Doctors affiliated with MDVIP charge a membership fee of $1,500 to $1,800 per year and limit their practices to no more than 600 patients. Plus, if you become ill while traveling, you may visit the nearest MDVIP doctor.

4. MAKE A HOUSE CALL. Before you write a check, visit the doctor's office to see whether you like the practice. Ask how long appointments are and what services are included. Because concierge physicians limit the number of patients they see, you may end up on a waitlist for your doctor of choice.

5. CHECK YOUR INSURANCE. The relationship between health coverage and concierge care varies from state to state and practice to practice. Your health policy may cover procedures that the retainer doesn't cover, such as laboratory tests and diagnostic screenings. You'll likely have to pay out of pocket for the membership fee, although you may be able to use funds from a flexible spending account or health savings account to pay it.

6. IS IT WORTH IT? If you're exasperated with long waits, or if enhanced preventive screenings will help you sleep better, concierge service may be for you. If, however, you already have strong relationships with high-quality doctors, concierge service may not provide much benefit.

True, the Affordable Care Act will pull more patients into the health care system and may result in more-crowded waiting rooms. But, says Mark Pauly, professor of health care management at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, such overcrowding is unlikely in the affluent areas where concierge services operate.

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Lisa Gerstner is Associate editor at Kiplinger's Personal Finance.



All contents copyright 2013 The Kiplinger Washington Editors, Inc. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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