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April 21, 2014

Andrew Silow-Carroll: Passoverkill? Suggestions to make next year's seders even more culturally sensitive

Sara Israelsen Hartley: Seeking the Divine: An ancient connection in a new context

Christine M. Flowers: Priest's execution in Syria should be call to action

Courtnie Erickson: How to help kids accept the poor decisions of others

Lizette Borreli: A Glass Of Milk A Day Keeps Knee Arthritis At Bay

Lizette Borreli: 5 Health Conditions Your Breath Knows Before You Do

The Kosher Gourmet by Betty Rosbottom Coconut Walnut Bars' golden brown morsels are a beautifully balanced delectable delight

April 18, 2014

Rabbi Yonason Goldson: Clarifying one of the greatest philosophical conundrums in theology

Caroline B. Glick: The disappearance of US will

Megan Wallgren: 10 things I've learned from my teenagers

Lizette Borreli: Green Tea Boosts Brain Power, May Help Treat Dementia

John Ericson: Trying hard to be 'positive' but never succeeding? Blame Your Brain

The Kosher Gourmet by Julie Rothman Almondy, flourless torta del re (Italian king's cake), has royal roots, is simple to make, . . . but devour it because it's simply delicious

April 14, 2014

Rabbi Dr Naftali Brawer: Passover frees us from the tyranny of time

Greg Crosby: Passing Over Religion

Eric Schulzke: First degree: How America really recovered from a murder epidemic

Georgia Lee: When love is not enough: Teaching your kids about the realities of adult relationships

Cameron Huddleston: Freebies for Your Lawn and Garden

Gordon Pape: How you can tell if your financial adviser is setting you up for potential ruin

Dana Dovey: Up to 500,000 people die each year from hepatitis C-related liver disease. New Treatment Has Over 90% Success Rate

Justin Caba: Eating Watermelon Can Help Control High Blood Pressure

The Kosher Gourmet by Joshua E. London and Lou Marmon Don't dare pass over these Pesach picks for Manischewitz!

April 11, 2014

Rabbi Hillel Goldberg: Silence is much more than golden

Caroline B. Glick: Forgetting freedom at Passover

Susan Swann: How to value a child for who he is, not just what he does

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Financial Tasks You Should Tackle Right Now

Sandra Block and Lisa Gerstner: How to Profit From Your Passion

Susan Scutti: A Simple Blood Test Might Soon Diagnose Cancer

Chris Weller: Have A Slow Metabolism? Let Science Speed It Up For You

The Kosher Gourmet by Diane Rossen Worthington Whitefish Terrine: A French take on gefilte fish

April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Feb 7, 2014 / 7 Adar I, 5774

A nation of laws, not men, must impeach Obama

By Diana West




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | One of the hats I wear is that of Washington correspondent for Dispatch International, a European weekly newspaper co-edited by Danish journalist and historian Lars Hedegaard. The name may ring a bell with U.S. readers because last February, a man dressed up as a postman with a fake package tried to assassinate Hedegaard, a noted critic of Islamization and proponent of free speech, at his home in Copenhagen. International headlines followed.

One year later, Hedegaard lives under state protection and there have been no arrests. But that's not what this week's column is about.

A few days ago, Hedegaard wrote me with a new assignment:

"Would you write something about a disturbing phenomenon: the fact that Obama rules by decree and neglects the Constitution. How can this go on? Nixon was a complete amateur compared to this would-be Kim Jong-un. It looks like a coup d'etat. Nobody talks about it in Europe."

So that's what America looks like from 4,000 miles away.

Given the lack of context "over there," my overview had to start with the basics of Barack Obama's presidency: numerous unconfirmed "tsars" (like George W. Bush), sweeping executive orders and massive amounts of regulation. "I've got a pen and I've got a phone" is the way the president recently described his tools of power, noticeably omitting whether he also had a copy of the U.S. Constitution. By the time I'd recapped the so-called unilateral presidency for the European reader, I was newly aghast.

For many Americans, living through the Obama era day-by-day, executive order by executive order, 100 regulations by 100 regulations (there were 80,000 pages of new regulations in 2013 alone), our nation's transformation becomes so much enveloping static. Yes, there are shrieks and screams (over Obamacare's rollout, for instance), but mostly people seem to shut out the background noise of an aggressively collectivizing government doing business. Outrages against the Constitution clank and sputter -- What? The executive branch can't write legislation! -- but they never really backfire on Obama. His poll numbers dip, yes. White noise ensues.

Such ambivalence may stem from the fact that many Americans are not well educated about how our government of three co-equal branches is supposed to function. Confession: Despite private school and an Ivy League education, I didn't really get the picture until later in life.



Barack Obama, the government's chief executive, is seizing powers that belong to the legislative branch. He's not the first president to do so; not by a long shot. That's also part of the ambivalence problem. Obama fits an accepted historical mode of abuse exemplified, for example, by the even more dictatorial FDR. Meanwhile, as Obama's defenders correctly note, Obama, having issued 168 "decrees," ranks on the low end among modern presidents. What distinguishes Obama's fiats in our time, however, as Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, told CNS News, is that Obama "has repeatedly made use of executive orders to change statute, to change law, to change legislation enacted by Congress."

A president can't do that. The crisis exists because the legislative branch is letting him.

The crisis is compounded because most of the media supports these seizures of power. The New York Times' take on the State of the Union address (Rush Limbaugh calls it the "State of the Coup,") is typical: "Taking the offensive by veering around Congress isn't new for the administration, but it is more important than ever."

"Veering around Congress" is a neat phrase for serial abuse of power. During a December hearing before a House Judiciary subcommittee on "The President's Constitutional Duty to Faithfully Execute the Laws," liberal law professor (and onetime Obama voter) Jonathan Turley stated: "The problem with what the president is doing is that he's not simply posing a danger to the constitutional system. He's becoming the very danger the Constitution was designed to avoid."

The president is quite open about his intentions. "Wherever and whenever I can take steps without legislation ... that's what I'm going to do," Obama declared in his State of the Union. The line received vigorous applause from Democrats in the House chamber. Yes, they support the president's agenda, but weren't they also applauding their own superfluity?

That's what I thought before I heard Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, say that writing executive orders for the president to sign -- not writing legislation for Congress to vote on, mind you -- should be "our No. 1 agenda." The 10-term congresswoman, while launching the new and Soviet-sounding "Full Employment Caucus" at a recent press conference, promised to "give President Obama a number of executive orders that he can sign with pride and strength."

This is the formula for one-party rule. As such, it is outrageous, but it is just more static.

To be sure, some conservative Republicans -- Sen. Mike Lee, as well as Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, for example -- are speaking out against what Cruz calls the "imperial presidency." But will their impassioned voices become static, too?

What to do with a president who rewrites his own laws, enacts legislation that has failed (repeatedly) to pass into law, and creates legislation through executive agency regulation? Obama has done all of the above, and more -- for example, rewriting parts of Obamacare, implementing much of the repeatedly rejected DREAM Act, and creating cap-and-trade carbon restrictions, also rejected by Congress, through a web of EPA regulations. He promises to raise the minimum wage for federal workers, and is reported to be exploring how to unilaterally lift sanctions on Iran. Just this week, head-spinningly, Obama lifted a ban on aliens who supported terrorists, thereby permitting them to enter the country. As for his promise that if you like your doctor, you can keep you doctor, that, we know, was pure fraud.

The boldest proposition on the table so far -- not moving, I will add -- is for Congress to stop funding executive orders that upset the Constitution's "balance of powers." This is an obvious "check" to restore "balance." Fine. Yes. Go for it.

But Obama's systematic assaults on constitutional governance require more than defunding, and more than static. They require, first and most urgently, a full airing. Impeachment, which may begin with an impeachment inquiry, is the means the Constitution provided us. It offers the way "forward," as the president might say, to re-establish that America is a nation of laws, not men.

Otherwise, it's not.

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