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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Jan 31, 2012/ 9 Shevat, 5772

Liberal and Catholic? It will soon be time to pick sides

By Jack Kelly




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Perhaps you've heard of the First Amendment. It says: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abidging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peacefully to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

The First Amendment is part of the Bill of Rights, as the first ten amendments to the Constitution are known. Most at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787 didn't think a Bill of Rights was necessary. But George Mason said he couldn't support the Constitution unless it contained a Bill of Rights, and an amendment to prohibit importation of slaves.

Mason didn't get his way on the anti-slavery amendment, but ultimately did on the Bill of Rights. Voted down in Philadelphia, he took his case to the convention Virginia called to decide whether or not to ratify the Constitution.

A Bill of Rights is necessary, Mason said, because "if the people in government care not to be restricted by the Constitution they are sworn to uphold, and if the people do not know about, or place a high price on their liberties, than we should not be surprised that they are so easily trampled."

James Madison agreed to add a Bill of Rights to the Constitution if it were ratified. The first Congress approved in on Sep. 25, 1789. Madison wrote the Bill of Rights, but it was based on the Virginia Declaration of Rights, which George Mason had written in 1776.

The language Madison initially proposed for the religious portion of the First Amendment made its intent more clear: "The civil rights of none shall be abridged on account of religious belief or worship, nor shall any national religion be established, nor shall the full and equal rights of conscience by in any manner, or in any pretext, infringed."

President Barack Obama and his secretary of Health and Human Services, Kathleen Sebelius, evidently haven't heard of the First Amendment. She announced Jan. 20 that under Obamacare, all employers who provide health insurance to their employees must not only provide, but subsidize, contraception, sterilization and abortion-inducing drugs. Churches themselves would be exempted, but religious colleges, hospitals and charities would be forced to comply, even though Christians generally, and Roman Catholics in particular, believe that abortion is morally wrong. If that doesn't constitute infringement of their "full and equal rights of conscience," I don't know what does.

"The Obama Administration has cast aside the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, denying to Catholics our Nation's first and most fundamental freedom, that of religious liberty," wrote Alexander Sample, the bishop of Marquette, in a letter to his parishioners.

His letter, and similar ones from other bishops were read aloud in thousands of Catholic churches Sunday (1/29).

"We cannot -- we will not -- comply with this unjust law," Bishop Sample said. "People of faith cannot be made second class citizens."

Pope Benedict XVI called the rules a "grave threat." Several bishops are planning civil disobedience. This controversy won't go away soon, and it won't enhance the popularity of Obamacare. Ms. Sebelius may regret triggering it in an election year.

By committing "a politically stupid act," Mr. Obama is "risking all the many achievements of political liberalism," wrote Michael Sean Winters, a columnist for the National Catholic Register. "I do not see how I ever could, in good conscience, vote for this man again."

The president "threw his progressive Catholic allies under the bus and strengthened the hand of those inside the Church who had originally sought to derail the health care law," said Washington Post columnist E.J. Dionne.

Liberal Catholics are going to have to come to grips with the fact that as the left becomes more overtly hostile to religion, it's going to get harder to be both liberal and Catholic. The controversy so far has drawn little attention from the news media, which has focused on its implications for the elections this year, the lesser question.

It's plain the people who run the government now "care not to be restricted by the Constitution they are sworn to uphold." Thanks to George Mason, we have a Bill of Rights to remind us of our liberties. Will we let the Obama administration trample on them so easily?

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JWR contributor Jack Kelly, a former Marine and Green Beret, was a deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force in the Reagan administration.

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