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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Feb. 15, 2011 / 11 Adar I, 5771

NPR, PBS Federal Subsidies Should Go

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | The liberal group Moveon.org has been sending out e-mails to warn that Republicans are back in control of the House and to ask recipients to sign a petition that states, "Congress must protect NPR and PBS and guarantee them permanent funding, free from political meddling."

Of course, the best way to guarantee no political meddling would be to eliminate some $500 million in federal funds allocated annually to these media's parent organization, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Also of course, the fact that Moveon.org wants to keep federal tax dollars pouring into the public broadcasting bucket should end any question as to whether NPR and PBS news programs lean left. They do.

Yet for all his deficit-reduction talk in the face of America's $14 trillion federal debt, President Obama wants to increase CPB's funding by $6 million in 2014.

Last year, former Clinton White House Chief of Staff Erskine Bowles and GOP Sen. Alan Simpson of Wyoming -- co-chairmen of Obama's bipartisan commission on reducing the national debt -- showed more fortitude. They released their own debt-reduction plan to cut domestic spending by $100 billion. "The current CPB funding is the highest it has ever been," the Bowles-Simpson plan explained. Their plan: Eliminate all of it.

I think public broadcasting stations would be better off if they stopped sucking at the public teat. If viewers and listeners thought that they weren't already contributing by paying taxes, perhaps they would be more inclined to pony up during pledge drives.

And maybe public broadcasters would lose some of their irritating sense of entitlement. Consider their new website, 170millionAmericans.org -- a name that is supposed to represent the NPR and PBS base. If public stations had that kind of support, they wouldn't need to claim they had that kind of support.

Then there's the question of whether taxpayers should be paying for more radio and television. As Rep. Doug Lamborn, R-Colo., wrote in a congressional newspaper, The Hill, "What I oppose is subsidizing an organization that no longer provides, if it ever did, an essential government service. When the federal government is now borrowing more than 40 cents of every $1 it spends, no one can justify paying for services that are widely available in the private market."

The bias issue won't go away. In October, NPR fired Senior News Analyst Juan Williams after he said on Fox News that he got "nervous" when he saw people dressed in Muslim garb on a plane.

NPR CEO Vivian Schiller denied that the firing had anything to do with the fact that one of NPR's own appeared regularly on the conservative cable network. In light of snide personal remarks for which Schiller later apologized, few believed her.

The 170 Million Americans site extols public broadcasting, thus: "The free flow of ideas and debate helps us participate in the political process as informed citizens." Problem: A free flow of ideas doesn't run in one direction; it flows both ways. But I don't think NPR swells understand that.

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© 2011, Creators Syndicate

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