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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Feb. 18, 2010 / 4 Adar 5770

There Is No Keynesian Miracle

By Paul Johnson





http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | During 2009 there was a lot of smug talk among academic and political liberals of Keynesianism enjoying a triumphant revival. But in the real world of jobs, wages and production—as opposed to the imaginary one of the chattering classes—the evidence shows that John Keynes' notion of being able to spend your way out of recession has not worked this time, if it ever did. It's important to note that ordinary voters are more sharply aware of this idea's failure than are the Western governments that have put their trust in Keynes.


The Obama Administration and British Prime Minister Gordon Brown's government both chose to meet the credit crisis and subsequent recession with huge increases in public spending and debt. Brown even boasted that by doing so he had "saved the world."


However, the European Union, led by Germany, proved reluctant to tread the Keynesian road and shoulder vast burdens of government debt. The result of this decision can be seen in the rise of the euro against the dollar and the pound and in the fact that Germany and France are now pulling out of recession.


China and India declined to go for a full-bloodied Keynesian solution. Their economies have continued to expand, if more slowly than before the crisis, and both are in a strong position to exploit the new decade's opportunities. China has notably narrowed the gap between its economy and that of the U.S.


Meanwhile, the U.S. and Britain are still deeply mired in recession, having acquired a vast amount of new government debt to no constructive purpose. No amount of juggling with unemployment figures can obscure the fact that in both countries real jobs are still being lost and that the creation of phony government ones is not altering the drop in family incomes. The public senses the truth, and the signs point to voters taking a fearful revenge on the Keynesian "miracle workers."


Sometime this spring Brown's New Labour government will be forced to hold an election, and it will almost certainly go down in catastrophic defeat. What kind of government will succeed is unclear—a homogenous regime under David Cameron and the Tories or a coalition with the Liberal Democrats. But either way, after a dozen disastrous years in power, New Labour will disappear as an experiment in ultraliberalism, with half its MPs losing their seats.


In the U.S. the Democrats' loss of the Massachusetts Senate seat that had been theirs for more than 50 years is a harbinger of doom. Unless Obama radically changes his approach to government the portents are for the Democrats to be decisively defeated in the midterm congressional elections and for Obama himself to follow the hapless Jimmy Carter as a one-term President.


One of the great modern myths taught in some university economics departments is that government treasuries can be run in a fundamentally different way from the finances of private families. This mythology includes the belief that adding to public debt is a form of investment and that spending the taxpayers' money on a colossal scale and in a wanton manner may have positive economic virtues.

Letter from JWR publisher


There's no evidence that ordinary men and women, who have to make their own way and support their families in harsh reality, have ever swallowed these nostrums. Unlike governments, they do not have the legal right to print money and, therefore, do not entertain the self-deception that goes along with that. For them the penalties of foolishly acquiring debts they cannot repay are certain and disastrous, often involving ruin from which they may never emerge. Sensible people observe the basic rules of financial prudence: Expenditure must not exceed income, if possible; debt should be acquired reluctantly and liquidated as soon as can be; and, above all, there should be a continual and indefatigable effort to save and to invest sensibly.


The West became rich and powerful following these rules. Despite the profligate examples recently set by their governments, many people still wish to follow the path of financial prudence. For instance, in Britain the savings of average-income families, despite low interest rates and small returns, have increased since the crisis of 2008. And there is some evidence of a similar pattern in the U.S.


As for India and China, the propensity of their 2 billion inhabitants to save has never been stronger or more persistent. In both West and East true financial leadership has been provided not by the sophistries of liberal leaders but by the invisible masses of the poor.


It is important that we study—and learn from—the political lessons of recent events. Since the Democrats' debacle in Massachusetts, Republicans have begun to entertain positive hopes of recapturing the White House. Those who form Republican opinion should weigh carefully this new factor of popular financial probity.


It would be a welcome change to see a serious contender put forward a basic proposition of economic and financial policy such as the following axiom: "There is nothing essentially different between running government finances and those of a family. The same penalties for recklessness and folly apply to both. And, in both, the same prudence, integrity and self-sacrifice will bring success. Anyone who tells you different is deceiving you."


It is clear that such an approach would bring electoral dividends and, more important, national solvency and prosperity.

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Previously:

10/20/09: A Job Waiting for a Woman?
07/21/09: Obama Has to Be World Sheriff
03/24/09: Short works of genius that cheer up the writing profession
02/11/09: What would Darwin do?
01/27/09: Are you sophisticated? Here's how to find out
01/06/09: What did they talk about in the Ice Age? The weather, of course
09/09/08: Time, and our appalling ignorance of it
08/19/08: Eye-stopping glimpses of an exotic and forbidden world
06/30/08: How to fill a lecture hall, and how to empty it
06/23/08: Americans should count their blessings
05/20/08: Pajamas for Presidents
05/13/08: Literary woodlice boring needless holes in biographical bedposts
04/01/08: When markets come crashing down, send for the man with the big red nose
04/01/08: Quality for dinner. Pass the Fairy Liquid, Old Boy
03/25/08: In search of an American President with brains and guts
03/18/08: Technological warfare against mice won't work. Try cats
03/11/08: What is a genius? We use the word frequently but surely, to guard its meaning, we should bestow it seldom
03/03/08: Fiction as a crutch to get one through life
02/26/08: Impatience + Greed = Trouble
02/13/08: Shakespeare, Neo-Platonism and Princess Diana
02/07/08: Where Industry Has Failed Us
12/19/07: People who put their trust in human power delude themselves
12/12/07: What is aggression?
12/04/07: Pursuing success is not enough
11/07/07: Are famous writers accident-prone?
10/31/07: Courage needed to disarm Iran
09/20/07: Who Will Say ‘I Promise to Lay Off’?
07/24/07: Greed is safer than power-seeking
04/02/07: Benefactors must be hardheaded
03/07/07: American idealism and realpolitik
11/28/06: Space: Our ticket to survival
10/24/06: Envy is bad economics
10/11/06: Better to Borrow or Lend? Rethinking conventional wisdom
08/22/06: Don't practice legal terrorism
08/08/06: A summer rhapsody for a pedal-bike
08/03/06: Why is there no workable philosophy of music?
07/11/06: Historically speaking, energy crisis is America's opportunity
07/06/06: The misleading dimensions of persons and lives
06/06/06: First editions are not gold
05/23/06: A downright ugly man need never despair of attracting women, even pretty ones
04/25/06: Was Washington right about political parties?
04/12/06: Let's Have More Babies!
04/05/06: For the love of trains
03/29/06: Lincoln and the Compensation Culture
03/22/06: Bottle-beauties and the globalised blond beast
03/15/06: Europe's utopian hangover
03/08/06: Kindly write on only one side of the paper
02/28/06: Creators versus critics
02/21/06: The Rhino Principle

© 2009, Paul Johnson

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