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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Strawberries are health and nutrition powerhouses

By Anne Bliss





JewishWorldReview.com | "Eat your strawberries!" certainly isn't invoked as often as "Eat your spinach!" But it turns out that in addition to being juicy and delicious, strawberries may rival spinach--and most other foods--in health benefits. Here's what these mighty little berries can do:


1. Protect your heart


A Harvard study published in January links eating berries to a lower risk of heart attacks among younger women. The study followed women 25 to 42 who ate more than 3 (1/2-cup) servings of strawberries and/or blueberries each week over an 18-year span.


The findings? These women had a 34 percent reduced risk of heart attack compared to those who ate less than one serving per week. Researchers point to the berries' anthocyanin content as the protective factor. Tip for picking: The reddest berries have the most anthocyanins.


2. Keep your teeth healthy


Strawberries are the third-best food source of polyphenols (behind only coffee and olives), according to a 2009 Journal of Dentistry review. That's good news since researchers believe these compounds inhibit the breakdown of starches in the mouth (thus limiting the resulting sticky sugars that adhere to teeth as plaque) and also fight the bacteria that contribute to tooth decay and gum disease.


Scrubbing your teeth with strawberries will whiten them, but because the berries are so acidic, dentists warn that using this home remedy frequently could damage the enamel.


3. Deliver your vitamins


One cup of sliced strawberries provides 163 percent of your daily dose of vitamin C (more than a whole orange) and 12 percent Daily Value (DV) of fiber, as well as 9 percent DV of the B vitamin folate, all for a mere 46 calories. Store berries whole in the refrigerator so they retain the most vitamins or look for berries that have been frozen whole, which preserves more nutrients than slicing or crushing before freezing.


4. Quell sugar spikes


In a recent Finnish study, when healthy women ate white bread with strawberries, their glycemic response to the bread improved by 36 percent over that of subjects who ate just the bread. Researchers explain that components in the strawberries (polyphenols again!) slow the breakdown and absorption of carbs, decreasing the need for insulin to maintain normal blood glucose.


In another recent study published in the British Journal of Nutrition, when overweight adults consumed either a strawberry beverage or a placebo in combination with a high-carbohydrate meal, the strawberry drinkers showed a significant decrease in the potentially damaging inflammation that typically follows a high-carb meal.


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5. Inhibit cancer


Research increasingly points to strawberries as an anti-cancer powerhouse, though studies to date have mostly examined strawberry extracts and powders.


A study published in the International Journal of Cancer showed that strawberry extracts inhibited the growth of lung tumors in mice exposed to cigarette smoke, and a 2012 Chinese clinical trial demonstrated that freeze-dried strawberry powder has potential for preventing esophageal cancer. Strawberries have also been found to be protective against other cancers, including oral, breast and cervical.

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(EatingWell is a magazine and website devoted to healthy eating as a way of life. Online at www.eatingwell.com.)









© 2014, Eating WEll, Inc. DISTRIBUTED BY TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.

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