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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Jan. 15, 2014/ 14 Shevat, 5774

Giving to charity --- whether she wants to or not

By Celia Rivenbark

Celia Rivenbark




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | (MCT) The pizza had been ordered — pepperoni, mushroom, black olives and banana peppers just like always — but I was still on the phone because the guy was asking if I'd like to add a dessert.

"Would you like to try our chocolate molten lava cake?"

Well. It is the holiday season.

"Sure," I said. "Why not?"

"Great!" he said. And then, very quickly, "Would you like to donate one dollar to (blippetyblip) children's charity?"

Say what?

Think about it. There is simply no answer but "yes" to that. You've already acknowledged that you've got plenty of cash for empty fat and calories. How can you possibly say you won't spend just one more dollar to help a needy kid?

How exactly would that convo go in your head?

"Sure I got money for gooey cake I didn't know existed five seconds ago but spend a buck for a poor kid? Nah, not today. Like I always say "!@#$% 'em."



Guilt-giving is everywhere now. You go to the drugstore and every transaction is followed by "Would you like to donate your change rounded up to the nearest dollar to XXX?"

Well, of course. I mean, I guess. I mean, what IS XXX anyway? I've never heard of it.

"It's for the kids," was the uber bored response from the clerk.

"Yeah, I kinda got that what with Kids in the name and all."

But, yeah, sure. I guess. Take the 48 cents.

The bell ringer gave me the stink eye when I didn't have any change for his kettle on the way out.

"Save the attitude, Pops, I gave it all away in there. Take it up with them."

At one store, not to name names but everything's a dollar there, the clerk rang me up and robo-asked "Would you like to donate a toy to a wounded warrior's child in need?"

When I said, "I guess so" the clerk looked genuinely surprised.

"You would?"

She plucked an extremely cheap looking little plastic airplane from a pile near the register and tossed it into a box. I shouldn't have.

At the grocery store, I was asked if I would like to donate a pie to the troops in Afghanistan. A PIE? How about decent housing for their families back home?

I've marveled at the folks who resist this without even blinking.

The guy ahead of me had a cart full of artichokes and expensive wine.

"Would you like to donate a dollar to Alzheimer's research?"

"No."

Whoa.

Of course, for all I know, he just spent all day in a lab working on a cure for dementia and just took a brief artichokes and wine break. Who am I to judge? You kidding? Have we met?

My friend, Kevin, usually says "No" but spends a minute or two explaining to the clerk who doesn't care that he gives through an employee campaign and his kids need braces and his transmission is leaking andů

It's really kinda cute.


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Celia Rivenbark is the New York Times bestselling author of 'You Don't Sweat Much for a Fat Girl'.


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