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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

This diet -- even without weight loss -- lowers chances of Type 2 diabetes by 40 percent

By Melissa Healy






Not a scam; no pill purchase necessary


JewishWorldReview.com | (MCT) Even without weight loss, adhering to a diet rich in fresh produce, chicken, fish and olive oil is 40 percent more effective in heading off the development of Type 2 diabetes than following a low-fat diet, a new study has found.

The research suggests that for the nation's 78 million obese adults, a diet that minimizes red meat and sweets but incorporates plant-based fats may be a sustainable way to improve health — even if permanent weight reduction proves elusive.

The findings add to mounting research that suggests a traditional Mediterranean diet may be easier to adhere to and more likely to improve health than more restrictive regimens.

Compared with those on a low-fat diet, trial participants whose Mediterranean-style diet was supplemented with a daily dose of tree nuts — almonds, walnuts and hazelnuts — were 18 percent less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. The researchers called that a positive trend but acknowledged that the difference fell short of demonstrating beyond doubt the superiority of such a diet over a standard low-fat diet.

Published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the latest entry in the diet fray followed for more than four years a group of 3,541 older Spaniards who were at high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. They were a subgroup of a larger clinical trial that demonstrated the effectiveness of the Mediterranean diet in reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.

That trial of 7,447 subjects — documented in February in the New England Journal of Medicine — found that those placed on a Mediterranean diet supplemented with either nuts or extra-virgin olive oil were 30 percent less likely than those prescribed a low-fat diet to suffer a heart attack, stroke or death due to cardiovascular disease.

Nearly half of those recruited for the parent trial already had Type 2 diabetes.


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The subjects used in the current subgroup analysis started the trial with at least three risk factors for developing premature cardiovascular disease: They were active smokers; were overweight or obese; had a family history of premature heart disease; or had hypertension or worrisome cholesterol readings. None had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at the start of the trial.

Two-hundred-seventy-three participants went on to develop Type 2 diabetes. Among those in the Mediterranean diet-supplemented-with-extra-virgin-olive-oil arm, 6.9 percent developed diabetes; among those in the Mediterranean-diet-plus-nuts group, 7.4 percent did so; and among the low-fat dieters, 8.8 percent developed Type 2 diabetes.

Dr. Meir J. Stampfer, professor of medicine and epidemiology at Harvard University, called the research published Monday a significant step in further demonstrating the clinical benefits of the diet that until recently predominated in southern Europe. In showing the Mediterranean diet to be sustainable and beneficial, Stampfer said, the study should help put to rest many health-conscious Americans' aversion to nuts and oils, which are as calorie-dense as they are rich in unsaturated fats.

But Dr. David Heber of the University of California, Los Angeles' Center for Human Nutrition cautioned that Americans should not give up efforts to cut fat from their diets in a bid to improve health. He pointed to copious evidence supporting a widely available regimen known as the Diabetes Prevention Program: When people at risk for diabetes lose 5 percent to 10 percent of their body weight using a program that reduces calorie and fat consumption and boosts their exercise, they drive down the likelihood of developing diabetes over the next five years by close to 60 percent.

"Saying that it's beneficial to consume more olive oil, which has over 100 calories per tablespoon, without weight loss encourages magical thinking about diabetes," Heber added. For obese patients, he said, driving down one's risk of developing Type 2 diabetes requires weight management.

Dr. James B. Meigs, an internal medicine specialist at Harvard, noted that the latest research suggests a Mediterranean diet drives down diabetes risk as much as preventive use of the drug metformin. But that's still only half as powerful an effect as that seen in subjects participating in the Diabetes Prevention Program, which recommends at least 30 minutes a day of exercise and a low-fat, reduced-calorie diet.

Meigs said that while physicians still should advise obese patients to lose weight and exercise more, he sees "little harm of also encouraging" Mediterranean-style diets.

In the parent trial, subjects were urged to minimize sodas and fats that came in spreadable form, as well as limit consumption of commercially baked sweets and pastries to three times a week. They were told either to eat about a quarter-cup a day of either almonds, walnuts or hazelnuts, or to consume at least 4 tablespoons a day of extra-virgin olive oil.

Mediterranean dieters were told they could drink wine moderately — about seven glasses per week.



Aside from those guidelines, subjects in the Mediterranean diet arms of the trial had an "energy unrestricted" diet: They did not have a calorie limit, and fats made up between 35 percent and 40 percent of their daily calorie intake.

Low-fat dieters were told to avoid nuts and vegetable oils of all kinds, to limit store-bought sweets to less than one per week and to remove visible fat from meats. In addition to fruits and vegetables, they were encouraged to eat three servings of low-fat dairy products and three or fewer servings of bread, potatoes, pasta or rice each day.

The researchers also reported that, compared with subjects in the low-fat arm of their trial, those randomized into the two Mediterranean diet arms showed much stronger adherence to the guidelines.

"These differences were probably critical" to the divergent patterns of diabetes between those in the Mediterranean diet groups and those in the low-fat diet group, they wrote.

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© 2013, Los Angeles Times. Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.