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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Ask Mr. Know-It-All

By Gary Lee Clothier




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Q: Who founded Best Buy? When? -- W.L.C., Freeport, Maine

A: In 1966, Dick Schulze founded an audio component systems store he called Sound of Music in St. Paul, Minn. Later, inventory was expanded to include video products, computers and appliances. In 1983, the name was changed to Best Buy.

Q: Nolan Ryan became the first pitcher to throw 5,000 career strikeouts. Who was the hitter he struck out to reach that milestone? -- R.T.U., Roseburg, Ore.

A: On Aug. 22, 1989, in a home game between Ryan's Texas Rangers and the Oakland Athletics, he struck out Rickey Henderson in the fifth inning for strikeout No. 5,000. During that game, Ryan struck out a total 13 batters. He pitched the entire game, but the Rangers lost 2 to 0.

By the time Ryan ended his 27-year career in 1993, he had struck out a total of 5,714 batters. He had 324 wins and 292 losses.

Q: Who invented the safety pin? When? -- R.B., Fairfax, Va.

A: New York State-born Walter Hunt (1796-1859) received a patent for the modern safety pin in 1849. He sold his idea for $400, which is equivalent to about $10,000 today.

Pins used for clothing were first used in the 14th century Before the Common Era.



Q: I'll be traveling to New England this spring and would like to see the Lizzie Borden home. Where is it located? -- B.B., Rover, Mo.

A: Lizzie Borden was accused of brutally killing her father and her stepmother on Aug. 4, 1892. Borden was later acquitted of the murders, but speculation over her guilt continues to this day. The house, located at 92 Second St. in Fall River, Mass., has been restored to the look at the time of the murders and is now a bed and breakfast. For about $225 per night, you can sleep in Borden's or her parents' room. Guests have reported strange noises, flickering lights and apparitions of the murder victims. Check out the Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast Museum website: lizzie-borden.com. I have never stayed, but it is on my list.

Q: What is the name of an 11-sided polygon? -- H.C., Wood River, Neb.

A: A "hendecagon" or "undecagon" is an 11-sided figure.

Q: Actor Anthony Hopkins portrayed Richard Nixon in the 1995 film "Nixon." He portrayed a president in another movie, but I don't know which one. Can you tell me? -- T.L., Dover, Del.

A: He played John Quincy Adams in the 1997 film "Amistad."


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© 2011, Gary Clothier DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK

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