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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review

Why You Should Try Your Bank's Mobile App

By Cameron Huddleston







The gains, benefits that might not be that obvious


Although mobile banking is on the rise, it's certainly not widespread. Only 35% of cell phone users bank using their phones, according to a Pew Research Center survey. If you're not among them, you should consider downloading your bank's mobile app. Why? It's an incredibly convenient and secure way to bank, says Alex Matjanec, co-founder of MyBankTracker, an independent banking-information Web site.


If your bank offers an app, here are several of the features you can expect:


Banking alerts. Mobile banking apps typically give you the option to receive text-message alerts about your account activity, which Matjanec says are the biggest benefit of bank apps. While sitting at his desk one day, he received alerts through his bank's app when two $500 withdrawals had been made - and he hadn't made them. So he knew instantly that someone was stealing from his account. Most banks let customers sign up for alerts through their Web sites. But Matjanec says that the benefit of having the mobile app is that you can easily access your account and take immediate action when you get those alerts.


Bill payment. Many bank apps let you set up alerts to notify you when bills are due. With a few clicks, you can easily make payments while you're on the go through the app, Matjanec says.


Mobile deposits. When you get a check, many banks' apps eliminate the need to drive to an ATM or branch to deposit it. With the app, you simply enter the amount of the check, indicate the account into which you want it deposited and take a picture of the front and back of the check. However, Matjanec recommends hanging on to that check until it shows up in your account as a deposit.


Funds transfers. Some bank apps let you transfer funds to other people's accounts from your phone. So if you're at a restaurant with a friend, for example, and don't have cash to pay your half of the tab, you can easily send the money from your account to your friend's. Through the app, you type in the person's e-mail or phone number and how much money to send. That person will receive a message and finish the transaction.


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Merchant rewards. A few banks - such as Ally Bank, Bank of America and Capital One - offer customers with their apps discounts based on where they shop, Matjanec says. They can click on the "merchant rewards" tab in the app to see what deals are available from retailers where they typically make purchases.


Security. Matjanec says that using a bank's own mobile banking app is actually safer than banking online because it offers you direct access to your account - rather than requiring you to go through an Internet browser to get to your bank's Web site. However, you still need to take steps to protect your personal information, he says. First, make sure that your phone requires a passcode so no one but you can access it. Then when you download a mobile banking app, use all the security measures that are offered, such as personal identification numbers, or PINs, in addition to passwords. And when you log in to the app, make sure "save my user ID" is turned off so that others can't access your account if your phone falls into the wrong hands.


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Cameron Huddleston is an editor at Kiplinger.



All contents copyright 2013 Kiplinger's Personal Finance . Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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