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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Jan. 7, 2013/ 25 Teves, 5773

Getting Dirty Getting bin Laden

By Debra J. Saunders

Debra J. Saunders



http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | During George W. Bush's presidency, it was a matter of liberal faith that the use of enhanced interrogation techniques on al-Qaida members "undermine our moral authority and do not make us safer," as Barack Obama once put it. According to Obama, "enhanced interrogation techniques" are wrong, and — no matter what common sense tells you — they never work. Asking nicely works best with terrorists.

"Zero Dark Thirty" — Kathryn Bigelow's new thriller about the decadelong quest to bring Osama bin Laden to justice — doesn't cleave to that liberal orthodoxy.

At a preview Thursday, I saw a steely homage to the hardworking souls who endured the grueling slog to locate the man who ordered the 9/11 attacks. And yes, "Zero Dark Thirty" depicts an al-Qaida detainee who, after being waterboarded, gives up the first information about a courier to bin Laden.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein is hopping mad. Last month, her office sent a letter, co-signed by Sens. Carl Levin, D-Mich., and John McCain, R-Ariz., to Sony Pictures that called the movie "grossly inaccurate and misleading" in suggesting that harsh interrogations produced information that led to bin Laden.

The Senate Three now are investigating the CIA's communications with the filmmakers.

"Some U.S. senators now think they're film critics," quipped former CIA spokesman Bill Harlow. "For films they don't like, they start investigations."

Unfortunately for DiFi and company, not everyone is following the committee's script. Acting CIA Director Michael Morell released a statement on what the Hollywood movie got wrong. Morell wrote that "Zero Dark Thirty" underrepresents the "very large team" that found bin Laden — it wasn't "Maya" against Langley — and is wrong to suggest that harsh techniques "were the key to finding bin Laden." Buried in the statement, however, was the admission that some intelligence "came from detainees subjected to enhanced techniques."

Uh-oh. DiFi released a new letter, asking the CIA for more information. ?Does she really want it? In his book, "Hard Measures: How Aggressive CIA Actions After 9/11 Saved American Lives," CIA veteran Jose Rodriguez credited "enhanced interrogation techniques" — not waterboarding but a different act — with providing the courier nugget.

Not that he agreed with the movie. In The Washington Post last week, Rodriguez wrote that "Zero Dark Thirty" wrongly depicted CIA officers beating and freely waterboarding detainees, even leading one naked man around in a dog collar. To Rodriguez, CIA officers are more bureaucrat than cowboy. They had to receive written authorization before they could grasp a detainee. Government documents have revealed that the CIA waterboarded three high-value detainees, not more, and stopped in 2003.

So why is the Senate Intelligence Committee waging an inquisition to discredit a movie that, as Morell, former CIA Director Michael Hayden and former Attorney General Michael Mukasey believe, shows that harsh methods work?

Perhaps it has something to do with the fact that Democrats branded those techniques as "torture" and forced the Bush administration to end their authorized use. "Zero Dark Thirty" leaves little question that under Obama White House rules, the CIA no longer can use the techniques that led to bin Laden.

No worries. As the administration has refined the use of drones, intelligence officers do not have frequent opportunities to question high-value detainees. American morals are safe. There's no waterboarding of suspected al-Qaida leaders; we just kill them.

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© 2012, Creators Syndicate

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