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April 9, 2014

Jonathan Tobin: Why Did Kerry Lie About Israeli Blame?

Samuel G. Freedman: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Jessica Ivins: A resolution 70 years later for a father's unsettling legacy of ashes from Dachau

Kim Giles: Asking for help is not weakness

Kathy Kristof and Barbara Hoch Marcus: 7 Great Growth Israeli Stocks

Matthew Mientka: How Beans, Peas, And Chickpeas Cleanse Bad Cholesterol and Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

Sabrina Bachai: 5 At-Home Treatments For Headaches

The Kosher Gourmet by Daniel Neman Have yourself a matzo ball: The secrets bubby never told you and recipes she could have never imagined

April 8, 2014

Lori Nawyn: At Your Wit's End and Back: Finding Peace

Susan B. Garland and Rachel L. Sheedy: Strategies Married Couples Can Use to Boost Benefits

David Muhlbaum: Smart Tax Deductions Non-Itemizers Can Claim

Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.N., C.D.E : Before You Lose Your Mental Edge

Dana Dovey: Coffee Drinkers Rejoice! Your Cup Of Joe Can Prevent Death From Liver Disease

Chris Weller: Electric 'Thinking Cap' Puts Your Brain Power Into High Gear

The Kosher Gourmet by Marlene Parrish A gift of hazelnuts keeps giving --- for a variety of nutty recipes: Entree, side, soup, dessert

April 4, 2014

Rabbi David Gutterman: The Word for Nothing Means Everything

Charles Krauthammer: Kerry's folly, Chapter 3

Amy Peterson: A life of love: How to build lasting relationships with your children

John Ericson: Older Women: Save Your Heart, Prevent Stroke Don't Drink Diet

John Ericson: Why 50 million Americans will still have spring allergies after taking meds

Cameron Huddleston: Best and Worst Buys of April 2014

Stacy Rapacon: Great Mutual Funds for Young Investors

Sarah Boesveld: Teacher keeps promise to mail thousands of former students letters written by their past selves

The Kosher Gourmet by Sharon Thompson Anyone can make a salad, you say. But can they make a great salad? (SECRETS, TESTED TECHNIQUES + 4 RECIPES, INCLUDING DRESSINGS)

April 2, 2014

Paul Greenberg: Death and joy in the spring

Dan Barry: Should South Carolina Jews be forced to maintain this chimney built by Germans serving the Nazis?

Mayra Bitsko: Save me! An alien took over my child's personality

Frank Clayton: Get happy: 20 scientifically proven happiness activities

Susan Scutti: It's Genetic! Obesity and the 'Carb Breakdown' Gene

Lecia Bushak: Why Hand Sanitizer May Actually Harm Your Health

Stacy Rapacon: Great Funds You Can Own for $500 or Less

Cameron Huddleston: 7 Ways to Save on Home Decor

The Kosher Gourmet by Steve Petusevsky Exploring ingredients as edible-stuffed containers (TWO RECIPES + TIPS & TECHINQUES)

Jewish World Review Jan. 18, 2013 / 7 Shevat, 5773

There should be a (nother) law: No super-whoopee inaugurations for second-term presidents

By Ann McFeatters




http://www.JewishWorldReview.com | Yes, this nation needs something to celebrate, but a big hoopla over a second-term inaugural is not the ticket. — There should be a law: No super-whoopee inaugurations for second-term presidents.

The whole point is for the president to put his hand on a Bible and swear to uphold the Constitution. President Barack Obama already did that four years ago and enough people thought he was doing a good enough job that they re-elected him.

But custom dictates a monster rally in the nation's capital. This time, Obama has asked for corporate contributions to help pay for a big blast. So much for we the people funding a people's party, which drew 1.8 million people in 2009.

Also, January in Washington is cold. It is always cold on Inauguration Day. Travelers from far parts of the realm come to town totally unprepared for how cold it is. They get frostbite. They get lost. They look in vain for a downtown Wal-Mart to buy scarves and mittens. They stand for hours in crowded Metro stations waiting for overcrowded trains. (Taxi drivers have fled to Florida.)

The highlight after the oath of office is the speech. Seldom are second-term speeches riveting, although they can be long. Very long. Did I mention it is held outdoors and the weather is cold?

In 1841, William Henry Harrison spoke outside the Capitol for one hour and 45 minutes in a snowstorm. One month later, he died of pneumonia. Our first president, George Washington, was no dummy. His second inaugural address was only 135 words.

Obama has promised to keep his second inaugural address under 20 minutes. After all, in February he gets to give the State of the Union speech before Congress. It is held inside the Capitol where it is warm. Besides, most people at the swearing- in want to hear Beyonce sing.

After the speech and a lunch in the Capitol comes the parade. Every four years, weeks before Inauguration Day, carpenters start building a giant reviewing stand in front of the White House. It has seats, carpet, miles of glass and heaters. The day after the parade they start tearing it down.

It is now traditional for the president and first lady somewhere along the parade route to get out of the presidential limousine, which this year will sport a District of Columbia license plate reading "Taxation without representation" because D.C. is a ward of the federal government. This walk terrifies the Secret Service, so manholes are locked down, trash receptacles are spirited away and cadres of guys with guns are on nearly every rooftop along the route from the Capitol to the White House.

True, it is exciting for high school bands and girls on horseback to be asked to appear in the parade. But after waiting in outlying parking lots for hours, by the time they pass by the reviewing stand in front of the White House, their little feet are frozen and their parents are worried sick.

The president and his family and corporate sponsors and friends sit in the heated stands to watch the bands and horses pass by. Sadly, there are no giant floats made out of 50, 000 flowers. The president tries desperately not to look at his watch. It is now customary for many VIPs to raffle off their parade-seat tickets.

The term Inaugural Ball has a romantic ring. People think "Cinderella." In truth, these events are horrible, held in crowded public buildings. It is difficult to get to the soft drinks and potato chips, let alone move or dance. Women who have mistakenly worn fancy high-heeled shoes are miserable. The highlight is when the president and first lady arrive and dance for a few seconds and then disappear. Former President Bill Clinton's second inauguration featured 14 balls, although Obama's has only two official balls: one for the military and one for 35,000. The evening ends with a mad crush at the coat check and frantic VIPs trying to find their rented limos. Apparently, most limos look alike.

But first-term inaugurations? They're a blast. Only four more years!

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Previously:


11/29/12: Congress hates us
11/16/12: A holiday gift guide for our politicians
08/10/12: Rise in independent voters imperils moderates
07/23/12: Looking forward to the presidential debates
07/13/12: A do-nothing Congress exacts high costs
06/25/12: Take a vacation: It's your duty
06/19/12: Dems: 'Do something'
04/30/12: Will Mitt Romney finally let a hair down?
04/23/12: Warning: Nasty presidential race ahead
04/02/12: We need to talk about aging
03/26/12: A Clinton-Bush matchup in 2016?
03/19/12: Autumn presidential debate topics lining up nicely
03/12/12: Unpacking presidential campaign myths
03/05/12: Time for Romney's vision, not goofiness, gaffes
01/13/12: Romney makes life difficult with many flubs
11/24/11: Obama has most to fear from Huntsman
10/04/11: Romney looks like ‘The One’
09/28/11: At last some good news on energy
09/21/11: Time to make pols squirm
08/29/11: America still shows the power of the individual
08/17/11: Like us, Lady Liberty in disrepair, but still strong




© 2011, SCRIPPS HOWARD NEWS SERVICE

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